Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Fewer headaches on the horizon, thanks to latest guidelines

Date:
January 7, 2010
Source:
SAGE Publications
Summary:
If you're one of the millions of headache sufferers around the world, more effective relief might be on the way in years to come. That's because the International Headache Society has just published new research guidelines intended to stimulate more research into headache treatment, and to provide researchers with guidelines to cut health risks associated with treatment.

If you're one of the millions of headache sufferers around the world, more effective relief might be on the way in years to come. That's because the International Headache Society has just published new research guidelines intended to stimulate more research into headache treatment, and to provide researchers with guidelines to cut health risks associated with treatment.

The guidelines appear in the latest issue of Cephalalgia, now published by SAGE.

Dr Lars Bendtsen and his team from the Clinical Trials Standing Committee of the International Headache Society in Copenhagen, Denmark developed new recommendations on how to improve the quality and safety of the research into treatments for episodic and chronic tension-type headaches. The guidelines will enhance clinical trial safety for patients, and will also allow researchers to determine if older drugs still used to treat tension-type headaches are as effective and safe as they should be.

The last research guidelines for tension-type headache research were published in 1995, but few novel or evidence-based treatment options have become available since that time. Focusing specifically on episodic tension-type headaches (ETTH) and chronic tension-type headaches (CTTH), Bendtsen's goal is to spur new research into the treatment of these commonly occurring headaches. This includes analgesics for episodic headaches as well as preventative treatments for chronic headache sufferers.

Millions of people suffer from ETTH, which can range in frequency from a few times a year to 14 times a month. Many people suffer from CTTH, which can be debilitating. The treatments for these can vary profoundly depending on the severity of the condition.

Over the years, research has found that analgesics -- otherwise known as pain-relievers -- are usually the most effective way of treating all but the most severe episodic headaches. However, severe episodic headaches and CTTH will often benefit from preventative treatments, which is usually the most effective way of providing lasting relief. Researchers have also found that chronic headache sufferers seldom benefit from analgesics.

Given the many kinds of headache medications available today, and the frequency with which these pain relievers and other treatments are used, new research into tension-related headache treatments will have a great impact on public health. Numerous studies have established that frequent use of analgesics for episodic headaches can increase the risk of side-effects, and can even lead to kidney and liver problems over time. Therefore, identifying more effective treatments for headache sufferers will allow physicians to be more targeted in their choice of drugs. Ultimately, this will translate into a more pain-free life for the tens of millions of people around the world suffering from occasional and chronic tension-type headaches.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by SAGE Publications. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. L Bendtsen, ME Bigal, R Cerbo, HC Diener, K Holroyd, C Lampl, DD Mitsikostas, TJ Steiner, and P Tfelt-Hansen on behalf of the International Headache Society Clinical Trials Subcommittee. Guidelines for controlled trials of drugs in tension-type headache: second edition. Cephalalgia, 2009; DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-2982.2009.01948.x

Cite This Page:

SAGE Publications. "Fewer headaches on the horizon, thanks to latest guidelines." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 January 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100106082529.htm>.
SAGE Publications. (2010, January 7). Fewer headaches on the horizon, thanks to latest guidelines. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100106082529.htm
SAGE Publications. "Fewer headaches on the horizon, thanks to latest guidelines." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100106082529.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Newsy (July 18, 2014) Yale researchers tested 135 men and women, and it was only obese women who were deemed to have "impaired associative learning." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Does Mixing Alcohol and Energy Drinks Boost Urge To Drink?

Does Mixing Alcohol and Energy Drinks Boost Urge To Drink?

Newsy (July 18, 2014) A new study suggests that mixing alcohol with energy drinks makes you want to keep the party going. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pot Cooking Class Teaches Responsible Eating

Pot Cooking Class Teaches Responsible Eating

AP (July 18, 2014) Following the nationwide trend of eased restrictions on marijuana use, pot edibles are growing in popularity. One Boston-area cooking class is teaching people how to eat pot responsibly. (July 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins