Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hacking into cells' communications system could lead to new drugs to tackle neurodegeneration

Date:
January 26, 2010
Source:
European Molecular Biology Laboratory
Summary:
By determining the structure of DAPK bound to calmodulin, scientists in Germany have found a way to hack into a vital cellular communications system, raising the possibility of developing new drugs to tackle disorders like neurodegeneration, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

This image shows the three-dimensional structure of Death-Associated Protein Kinase (green and yellow) when bound to calmodulin (violet and blue). It was obtained by X-ray crystallography.
Credit: Mathias Wilmanns/EMBL

Cells rely on a range of signalling systems to communicate with each other and to control their own internal workings. Scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Hamburg, Germany, have now found a way to hack into a vital communications system, raising the possibility of developing new drugs to tackle disorders like neurodegeneration, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

In a study published in Science Signaling, they have pieced together the first snapshot of what two of the system's components look like while interacting.

One way these signalling systems work is by triggering a flood of calcium ions inside the cell. These get picked up by a receiver, a protein called calmodulin which turns this calcium signal into action by switching various parts of the cell's machinery on or off. Calmodulin regulates a set of proteins called kinases, each of which controls the activity of specific parts of the cell, thus altering the cell's behaviour.

Using high-energy X-rays produced by the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France, and by the German Synchrotron Radiation Centre (DESY), in Hamburg, Germany, Matthias Wilmanns' team at EMBL revealed the molecular structure of one of these kinases, a protein called Death-Associated Protein Kinase DAPK, when bound to calmodulin. The structure showed how calmodulin binds to a particular section of DAPK, switching the kinase on so that it can go and change the function of its targets. The team then worked out which of DAPK's building blocks, or amino acids, were crucial for calmodulin to bind.

"Faulty versions of DAPK are involved in the development of some cancers," says Wilmanns, "so we want to know more about how this protein functions to allow its better exploitation as an anti-cancer target."

What's more, DAPK has physical similarities to many of the other kinases controlled by calmodulin, meaning many of them are likely to interact with calmodulin in the same, or similar ways. Being able to see the three-dimensional structures of these proteins, how they clip together and alter each other's behaviour means researchers can devise ways to manipulate this interaction with drugs.

"That will provide a platform to get into drug discovery," says Wilmanns, adding, "obviously, this is the beginning of the story." He is planning to do so in an ongoing collaboration with Adi Kimchi's team at the Weizmann Institute in Israel and other groups from EMBL.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. De Diego, I., Kuper, J., Bakalova, N., Kursula, P., & Wilmanns, M. Molecular Basis of the Death Associated Protein Kinase %u2013 Calcium/Calmodulin regulator complex. Science Signaling, 26 January 2010

Cite This Page:

European Molecular Biology Laboratory. "Hacking into cells' communications system could lead to new drugs to tackle neurodegeneration." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 January 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100126091727.htm>.
European Molecular Biology Laboratory. (2010, January 26). Hacking into cells' communications system could lead to new drugs to tackle neurodegeneration. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100126091727.htm
European Molecular Biology Laboratory. "Hacking into cells' communications system could lead to new drugs to tackle neurodegeneration." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100126091727.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Where's a body buried? Buster's nose can often tell you. He's a cadaver dog, specially trained to find human remains and increasingly being used by law enforcement and accepted in courts. These dogs are helping solve even decades-old mysteries. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins