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Couples who say 'we' do better at resolving conflicts

Date:
February 5, 2010
Source:
University of California - Berkeley
Summary:
People often complain about those seemingly smug married couples who constantly refer to themselves as "we." But a new study suggests that spouses who use "we-ness" language are better able to resolve conflicts than those who don't.
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People often complain about those seemingly smug married couples who constantly refer to themselves as "we." But a new study from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests that spouses who use "we-ness" language are better able to resolve conflicts than those who don't.
Credit: iStockphoto/Pauline Vos

People often complain about those seemingly smug married couples who constantly refer to themselves as "we." But a new study from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests that spouses who use "we-ness" language are better able to resolve conflicts than those who don't.

UC Berkeley researchers analyzed conversations between 154 middle-aged and older couples about points of disagreement in their marriages and found that those who used pronouns such as "we," "our" and "us" behaved more positively toward one another and showed less physiological stress.

In contrast, couples who emphasized their "separateness" by using pronouns such as "I," "me" and "you" were found to be less satisfied in their marriages. This was especially true for older couples. Their use of separateness pronouns was most strongly linked to unhappy marriages, according to the study.

Moreover, the study found that older couples identified more as "we" than did their middle-aged counterparts, suggesting that facing obstacles and overcoming challenges together over the long haul, including raising families, may give couples a greater sense of shared identity.

"Individuality is a deeply ingrained value in American society, but, at least in the realm of marriage, being part of a 'we' is well worth giving up a bit of 'me,'" said UC Berkeley psychology professor Robert Levenson, a co-author of the study published last semester in the journal Psychology and Aging.

Previous studies have established that the use of "we-ness" or "separateness" language is a strong indicator of marital satisfaction in younger couples. These latest findings, however, take this several steps further by showing how powerful this correlation is in more established couples, linking it to the emotions and physiological responses that occur when spouses either team up or become polarized in the face of disagreements, researchers said.

"The use of 'we' language is a natural outgrowth of a sense of partnership, of being on the same team, and confidence in being able to face problems together," said study co-author Benjamin Seider, a graduate student in psychology at UC Berkeley.

In addition to Seider and Levenson, co-authors of the study are Gilad Hirschberger and Kristin Nelson, who conducted their research while at UC Berkeley's Institute of Personality and Social Research.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of California - Berkeley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Seider et al. We can work it out: Age differences in relational pronouns, physiology, and behavior in marital conflict.. Psychology and Aging, 2009; 24 (3): 604 DOI: 10.1037/a0016950

Cite This Page:

University of California - Berkeley. "Couples who say 'we' do better at resolving conflicts." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 February 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100128142143.htm>.
University of California - Berkeley. (2010, February 5). Couples who say 'we' do better at resolving conflicts. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100128142143.htm
University of California - Berkeley. "Couples who say 'we' do better at resolving conflicts." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100128142143.htm (accessed July 3, 2015).

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