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Youngest extra-solar planet discovered around solar-type star

Date:
February 19, 2010
Source:
University of Hertfordshire
Summary:
Astronomers have discovered the youngest extra-solar planet around a solar-type star, named BD+20 1790b.

Artistic impression of BD+20 1790b.
Credit: M. Hernán Obispo

Astronomers have discovered the youngest extra-solar planet around a solar-type star, named BD+20 1790b.

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The giant planet, six-times the mass of Jupiter, is only 35 million years old. It orbits a young active central star at a distance closer than Mercury orbits the Sun. Young stars are usually excluded from planet searches because they have intense magnetic fields that generate a range of phenomena known collectively as stellar activity, including flares and spots. This activity can mimic the presence of a companion and so can make extremely difficult to disentangle the signals of planets and activity.

University of Hertfordshire astronomers, Dr Maria Cruz Gálvez-Ortiz and Dr John Barnes, are part of the international collaboration that made the discovery.

Dr Maria Cruz Gálvez-Ortiz, describing how the planet was discovered, said: "The planet was detected by searching for very small variations in the velocity of the host star, caused by the gravitational tug of the planet as it orbits -- the so-called 'Doppler wobble technique.' Overcoming the interference caused by the activity was a major challenge for the team, but with enough data from an array of large telescopes the planet's signature was revealed."

There is currently a severe lack of knowledge about early stages of planet evolution. Most planet-search surveys tend to target much older stars, with ages in excess of a billion years. Only one young planet, with an age of 100 million years, was previously known. However, at only 35 million years, BD+20 1790b is approximately three times younger. The detection of young planets will allow the testing of formation scenarios and to investigate the early stages of planetary evolution.

BD+20 1790b was discovered using observations made at different telescopes, including the Observatorio de Calar Alto (Almería, Spain) and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma, Spain) over the last five years. The discovery team is an international collaboration including: M.M. Hernán Obispo, E. De Castro and M. Cornide (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain), M.C. Gálvez-Ortiz and J.R. Barnes, (University of Hertfordshire, U.K.), G. Anglada-Escudé (Carnegie Institution of Washington, USA) and S.R. Kane (NASA Exoplanet Institute, Caltech, USA).

The discovery has just been published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Hertfordshire. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. Hernán-Obispo, M.C. Gálvez -Ortiz, G. Anglada-Escudé, S.R. Kane, J.R. Barnes, E. de Castro and M. Cornide. Evidence of a massive planet candidate orbiting the young active K5V star BD 20 1790. Astronomy and Astrophysics, 2010; DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/200811000

Cite This Page:

University of Hertfordshire. "Youngest extra-solar planet discovered around solar-type star." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 February 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100218092752.htm>.
University of Hertfordshire. (2010, February 19). Youngest extra-solar planet discovered around solar-type star. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100218092752.htm
University of Hertfordshire. "Youngest extra-solar planet discovered around solar-type star." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100218092752.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

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