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Cultural history colors thought about bioethics, evolution

Date:
February 21, 2010
Source:
Duke University
Summary:
Popularized ideas about evolution assume that some human groups are more evolved than other human groups. These cultural views of evolution can have important ethical implications, says an expert on theological and biomedical ethics.

Cultural views of evolution can have important ethical implications, says a Duke University expert on theological and biomedical ethics. Because the popular imagination filters science through cultural assumptions about race, cultural history should be an essential part of biomedical conversations.

Amy Laura Hall, associate professor of Christian ethics at Duke University, argues that many popularized ideas about evolution assume that some human groups are more evolved than other human groups.

"I believe that evolutionary biology, as depicted in the popular press, too often uncritically reinforces ideas about race that privilege white, Western bodies and cultures. I see this at work today in new arguments for paternalism in Haiti, for example" says Hall, who participated on a panel at the AAAS annual meeting called "Genetics and Ethics: Different Views on the Human Condition" on February 17.

The panel of scholars from the fields of genetics and theology will focus on how genetics and its medical applications are communicated to the general public.

Hall's current research looks at ways evolutionary biology is conveyed in the popular media. She cites examples of television documentaries about evolution that portray human evolution commencing in Africa, using images of dark-skinned people "almost as living icons" to represent humanity at our genesis. "When evolution is depicted as an upward slope, those representing the origin are also often perceived as the nadir," she says.

Hall is looking at how these popular portrayals are reinforced in recent media coverage of the earthquake disaster in Haiti, coverage that she says depicts Haitians as more primal and less developed, and how this may influence relief efforts that are more paternalistic in nature.

"In order to seek more collaborative, less hierarchical models of international engagement or relief work, we need to discuss head-on the racist ways evolutionary biology has become dispersed," she says.

"In order to collaborate, you have to consider your potential collaborators as adults, rather than as people further down a slope of human development, thus assuming a kind of tacit paternalism," says Hall, whose training is as a moral theologian.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Duke University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Duke University. "Cultural history colors thought about bioethics, evolution." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 February 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100221143154.htm>.
Duke University. (2010, February 21). Cultural history colors thought about bioethics, evolution. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100221143154.htm
Duke University. "Cultural history colors thought about bioethics, evolution." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100221143154.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

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