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Psychosurgery makes gentle comeback

Date:
March 4, 2010
Source:
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International
Summary:
Psychosurgery is making a comeback. Recently published case series have shown encouraging results of so-called deep brain stimulation (DBS) in treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder, depressive disorders, and Tourette syndrome.

Psychosurgery is making a comeback. Recently published case series have shown encouraging results of so-called deep brain stimulation (DBS) in treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder, depressive disorders, and Tourette syndrome.

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In the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International, authors Jens Kuhn (University of Cologne) and Theo P J Gründer (Max Planck Institute, Cologne) and their co-authors provide an introduction to the method.

In order to determine the clinical utility of DBS in psychiatric disorders, the authors evaluated therapeutic studies from 1980 to 2009. They found improvement rates of between 35% and 70% in treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, and Tourette syndrome. The rate of side effects associated with DBS was usually low and mostly reversible by modulating the stimulation parameters.

This favourable side effect profile is not all that surprising because DBS is a procedure that is well known; it has been in use for 20 years. In Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, the method has proved to be so effective that it has been licensed as a therapeutic option for many years. To administer DBS, two electrodes are implanted into the patient that deliver continuous, high frequency, short electrical impulses, enabling modulation of the functional neuronal circuits. The electrodes are connected via a cable to an impulse generator, which is usually implanted below the collarbone.

Although DBS seems to offer new perspectives for the treatment of psychiatric disorders, further studies into its efficacy, mechanisms of action, and side effect profile -- and especially its long term course -- are needed.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jens Kuhn, Theo O. J. Gru%u0308ndler, Doris Lenartz, Volker Sturm, Joachim Klosterko%u0308tter, Wolfgang Huff. Deep Brain Stimulation for Psychiatric Disorders. Deutsches Ärzteblatt International, 2010; 107 (7): 105-13 DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2010.0105

Cite This Page:

Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. "Psychosurgery makes gentle comeback." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100304075705.htm>.
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. (2010, March 4). Psychosurgery makes gentle comeback. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100304075705.htm
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. "Psychosurgery makes gentle comeback." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100304075705.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

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