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Older non-smokers gain most from tobacco ban, study suggests

Date:
March 21, 2010
Source:
University of Edinburgh
Summary:
Older people who have never smoked benefit most from smoking bans, a study suggests.

Older people who have never smoked benefit most from smoking bans, a study suggests.

A study in New Zealand showed that, three years after a smoking ban on all workplaces was introduced, hospital admissions for heart attacks among men and women aged 55-74 fell by 9 per cent. This figure rose to 13 per cent for 55-74 year olds who had never smoked.

Overall, the research showed heart attacks among people aged 30 and over fell by an average of 5 per cent in the three years following the ban.

The study, involving scientists from the University of Edinburgh, examined trends in acute heart attacks following a change in legislation. The ruling, which updates a previous law in which smoking was outlawed in some public places, makes smoking illegal in all workplaces including bars and restaurants.

Researchers also found that heart attacks were reduced for ex-smokers of all ages, and that there was a greater decrease in hospital admissions for men compared with women.

In addition, the study found that people in more affluent neighbourhoods benefited more from the ban than those in poorer areas. This may be because they visit cafes and restaurants more often or because they are more likely to use the smoking ban as an incentive to quit.

Dr Jamie Pearce, of the University of Edinburgh's School of GeoSciences, who took part in the study, said: "This short-term research indicates a link between a smoking ban in bars and restaurants and a reduction in severe heart attacks. However, more work is needed to look at the effects of the ban in greater detail."

The study, carried out with the Universities of Otago and Canterbury in New Zealand and the University of Southampton, was published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Edinburgh. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ross Barnett, Jamie Pearce, Graham Moon, John Elliott, Pauline Barnett. Assessing the effects of the introduction of the New Zealand Smokefree Environment Act 2003 on Acute Myocardial Infarction hospital admissions in Christchurch, New Zealand. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 2009; 33 (6): 515 DOI: 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00446.x

Cite This Page:

University of Edinburgh. "Older non-smokers gain most from tobacco ban, study suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100316191450.htm>.
University of Edinburgh. (2010, March 21). Older non-smokers gain most from tobacco ban, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100316191450.htm
University of Edinburgh. "Older non-smokers gain most from tobacco ban, study suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100316191450.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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