Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New spam targeting Facebook users is invisible to most virus scans, says expert

Date:
March 22, 2010
Source:
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Summary:
Cyber-criminals are using fake e-mails to target Facebook users and deliver computer viruses that were being detected only by one-third of the 42 most common anti-virus products as of 12 noon March 18, says a leading cyber-crime researcher.

Cyber-criminals are using fake e-mails to target Facebook users and deliver computer viruses that were being detected only by one-third of the 42 most common anti-virus products as of 12 noon March 18, says a leading cyber-crime researcher at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).

Gary Warner, the UAB director of research in computer forensics, says his team in the UAB Spam Data Mine has been tracking the Facebook spam campaign for the past three days. While it is not in the data mine's list of the top 10 most prevalent malware threats, Warner says the fake Facebook messages and related viruses are serious.

"The malware being delivered is called 'BredoLab.' It has been occasionally spread by spam since May of 2009," Warner says. "The UAB Spam Data Mine has observed at least eight versions of the Facebook BredoLab malware since March 16.

"What is troubling is the newer versions of the BredoLab used in this latest attack campaign are not being detected by the majority of anti-virus services -- and that means the majority of users who unwittingly click on the bogus attachments linked to fake e-mails are going to have their computers infected," Warner says.

In this new campaign, cyber-criminals are using regular Internet e-mail services to deliver the false Facebook messages to the social media site's customers. The spam messages ask recipients to open an attachment in order to obtain new Facebook login information. Clicking the attachment exposes a user's computer to the BredoLab malware.

"Once a computer is infected with BredoLab, the cyber-criminals are able to add any other malicious software they desire to the infected computer, including password-stealing software, fake anti-virus software and spam-sending software," Warner says.

Warner warns that any legitimate company would never ask a customer to update his or her personal account information in an e-mail or through e-mail-embedded links or attachments.

"If there are questions about one of your account profiles, visit the site in question through your Web browser and log in as you normally would," he says. "If an entity has an important message for you, you'll be able to find it on its Web page."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alabama at Birmingham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Alabama at Birmingham. "New spam targeting Facebook users is invisible to most virus scans, says expert." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100322100518.htm>.
University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2010, March 22). New spam targeting Facebook users is invisible to most virus scans, says expert. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100322100518.htm
University of Alabama at Birmingham. "New spam targeting Facebook users is invisible to most virus scans, says expert." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100322100518.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) If you've ever watched "Back to the Future Part II" and wanted to get your hands on a hoverboard, well, you might soon be in luck. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) Researchers in South Korea are developing a robotic pilot that could potentially replace humans in the cockpit. Unlike drones and autopilot programs which are configured for specific aircraft, the robots' humanoid design will allow it to fly any type of plane with no additional sensors. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 20, 2014) Scientists in Tokyo have demonstrated what they say is the world's first 3D projection that floats in mid air. A laser that fires a pulse up to a thousand times a second superheats molecules in the air, creating a spark which can be guided to certain points in the air to shape what the human eye perceives as an image. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Apple Enters Mobile Payment Business

Apple Enters Mobile Payment Business

AP (Oct. 20, 2014) Apple is making a strategic bet with the launch of Apple Pay, the mobile pay service aimed at turning your iPhone into your wallet. (Oct. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins