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Novel nanoparticle vaccine cures type 1 diabetes in mice

Date:
April 8, 2010
Source:
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International
Summary:
Using a sophisticated nanotechnology-based "vaccine," researchers were able to successfully cure mice with type 1 diabetes and slow the onset of the disease in mice at risk for the disease. The study provides new and important insights into understanding how to stop the immune attack that causes type 1 diabetes, and could even have implications for other autoimmune diseases.

Using a sophisticated nanotechnology-based "vaccine," researchers were able to successfully cure mice with type 1 diabetes and slow the onset of the disease in mice at risk for the disease. The study, co-funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, provides new and important insights into understanding how to stop the immune attack that causes type 1 diabetes, and could even have implications for other autoimmune diseases.

The study, conducted at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, was published in the online edition of the scientific journal Immunity.

The research was led by Dr. Pere Santamaria from the Julia McFarlane Diabetes Researchers Center at the University of Calgary, Alberta. The researchers were looking to specifically stop the autoimmune response that causes type 1 diabetes without damaging the immune cells that provide protection against infections -- what is called an "antigen-specific" immunotherapy. Type 1 diabetes is caused when certain white blood cells (called T cells) mistakenly attack and destroy the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.

Antigen-specific immunotherapies, like Dr. Santamaria's work on nanovaccines, are a priority within JDRF's Immune Therapies program.

"Essentially there is an internal tug-of-war between aggressive T-cells that want to cause the disease and weaker T cells that want to stop it from occurring," said Dr. Santamaria, who is a JDRF Scholar -- a research award to academic scientists taking innovative and creative approaches to better treating and curing type 1 diabetes and its complications.

The researchers developed a unique vaccine comprised of nanoparticles, which are thousands of times smaller than the size of a cell. These nanoparticles are coated with protein fragments -- peptides -- specific to type 1 diabetes that are bound to molecules (MHC molecules) that play a critical role in presenting peptides to T cells. The nanoparticle vaccine worked by expanding the number of peptide-specific regulatory T cells that suppressed the aggressive immune attack that destroys beta cells. The expanded peptide-specific regulatory cells shut down the autoimmune attack by preventing aggressive autoimmune cells from being stimulated by either the peptide contained in the vaccine or by any other type 1 diabetes autoantigen presented simultaneously on the same antigen presenting cell.

The research also provided an important insight into the ability to translate these findings in mice into therapeutics for people with diabetes: nanoparticles that contained human diabetes-related molecules were able to restore normal blood sugar levels in a humanized mouse model of diabetes.

According to Teodora Staeva, Ph.D., JDRF Program Director of Immune Therapies, a key finding from the Alberta study is that only the immune cells specifically focused on aggressively destroying beta cells (or, alternatively, regulating these cells) responded to the antigen-specific nanoparticle vaccine. That means the treatment did not compromise the rest of the immune system -- a key consideration for the treatment to be safe and effective in an otherwise healthy person with type 1 diabetes. "The potential that nanoparticle vaccine therapy holds in reversing the immune attack without generally suppressing the immune system is significant," said Dr. Staeva. "Dr. Santamaria's research has provided both insight into pathways for developing new immunotherapies and proof-of-concept of a specific therapy that exploits these pathways for preventing and reversing type 1 diabetes."

Dr. Santamaria noted that the study had implications for other autoimmune diseases beyond type 1 diabetes. "If the paradigm on which this nanovaccine is based holds true in other chronic autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and others, nanovaccines might find general applicability in autoimmunity," he said.

The nanoparticle vaccine technology used in the study has been licensed by Parvus Therapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company arising from the University Technology International LP, the technology transfer and commercialization center for the University of Calgary. Parvus Therapeutics is focused on the development and commercialization of the nanotechnology-based therapeutic platform for the potential treatment of type 1 diabetes.

The researchers include Sue Tsai, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Afshin Shameli, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Jun Yamanouchi, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Xavier Clemente-Casares, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Jinguo Wang, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Pau Serra, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Yang Yang, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Zdravka Medarova, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA; Anna Moore, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA; and Pere Santamaria, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Sue Tsai, Afshin Shameli, Jun Yamanouchi, Xavier Clemente-Casares, Jinguo Wang, Pau Serra, Yang Yang, Zdravka Medarova, Anna Moore, and Pere Santamaria. Reversal of Autoimmunity by Boosting Memory-like Autoregulatory T Cells. Immunity, 2010; DOI: 10.1016/j.immuni.2010.03.015

Cite This Page:

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International. "Novel nanoparticle vaccine cures type 1 diabetes in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 April 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100408121054.htm>.
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International. (2010, April 8). Novel nanoparticle vaccine cures type 1 diabetes in mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100408121054.htm
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International. "Novel nanoparticle vaccine cures type 1 diabetes in mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100408121054.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

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