Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New freehand ultrasound system improves work flow and reduces scan time

Date:
May 17, 2010
Source:
American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society
Summary:
Researchers have developed an automated 3-D mapping and labeling system that reduces scan time and improves the work flow, efficiency, and accuracy of routine freehand ultrasound exams, according to a new study.

Researchers have developed an automated 3-D mapping and labeling system that reduces scan time and improves the work flow, efficiency, and accuracy of routine freehand ultrasound exams, according to a study presented at the American Roentgen Ray Society 2010 Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA.

"The labeling and measuring of free hand ultrasound images are operator dependent, time consuming, and are usually manually performed," said Calin Caluser, MD, lead author of the study. "The new 3-D mapping and labeling system that we have developed automatically records information and replaces steps in the image acquisition process (that are typically performed manually) with a simple key stroke," said Caluser.

The study measured the timing and accuracy of the new system in a realistic breast ultrasound phantom with small masses scattered throughout. "Results showed that the average scanning time per target using the new mapping and labeling system was up to 16 seconds per target; compared to at least 51 seconds per target using the standard scanning protocol. The system accurately measured and recorded the location of the masses in relation to the nipple (up to 2 mm), which is difficult to obtain using the manual method," said Caluser.

"The new system can be added to any existing ultrasound machine and the reduced time for scanning the patient can translate in improved work flow and efficiency," he said.

"In addition to the reduced examination time, there are other potential benefits to the patients. The mapping and labeling system can help obtain a second opinion from a different physician, may reduce the number of repeat ultrasound exams, and also could help in planning a patient's treatment. With clinical experience, we hope to improve the system and bring more features to help the patients and health care providers," said Caluser.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. "New freehand ultrasound system improves work flow and reduces scan time." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100502173451.htm>.
American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. (2010, May 17). New freehand ultrasound system improves work flow and reduces scan time. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100502173451.htm
American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. "New freehand ultrasound system improves work flow and reduces scan time." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100502173451.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Gulfstream G500, G600 Unveiling

Gulfstream G500, G600 Unveiling

Flying (Oct. 20, 2014) Watch Gulfstream's public launch of the G500 and G600 at their headquarters in Savannah, Ga., along with a surprise unveiling of the G500, which taxied up under its own power. Video provided by Flying
Powered by NewsLook.com
Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 20, 2014) Scientists in Tokyo have demonstrated what they say is the world's first 3D projection that floats in mid air. A laser that fires a pulse up to a thousand times a second superheats molecules in the air, creating a spark which can be guided to certain points in the air to shape what the human eye perceives as an image. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

3BL Media (Oct. 20, 2014) Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-fuel Impala Video provided by 3BL
Powered by NewsLook.com
What We Know About Microsoft's Rumored Smartwatch

What We Know About Microsoft's Rumored Smartwatch

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) Microsoft will reportedly release a smartwatch that works across different mobile platforms, has a two-day battery life and tracks heart rate. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins