Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

To publish or not to publish? That is the question

Date:
May 21, 2010
Source:
Indiana University School of Medicine
Summary:
A new study investigates reviewers' recommendations and their influence on medical journal editors who are the ultimate arbiters of whether the research is published or not.

For more than 50 years medical research has been vetted through the peer-review process overseen by medical journal editors who assign reviewers to determine whether work merits publication. A study published in PLoS ONE investigates reviewers' recommendations and their influence on journal editors who are the ultimate arbiters of whether the research is published or not.

Related Articles


"Published research is becoming a more and more significant factor in scientific dialogue. Physicians and other researchers are no longer the only readers of medical studies. Patients and their families and friends now regularly access medical literature. This makes the review process even more important," said study senior author William Tierney, M.D., a Regenstrief Institute investigator, Chancellor's Professor and professor of medicine at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

"Peer review provides an important filtering function with the goal of insuring that only the highest quality research is published. Yet the results of our analysis suggest that reviewers agree on the disposition of manuscripts -- accept or reject -- at a rate barely exceeding what would be expected by chance. Nevertheless, editors' decisions appear to be significantly influenced by reviewer recommendations," said Dr. Tierney, who is the Joseph J. Mamlin Professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

A total of 2,264 manuscripts submitted to the Journal of General Internal Medicine (JGIM) were sent by the editors for external review to two or three reviewers each during the study period. These manuscripts received a total of 5,881 reviews provided by 2,916 reviewers. Twenty-eight percent of all reviews recommended rejection. However, the journal's overall rejection rate was much higher -- 48 percent overall and 88 percent when all reviewers for a manuscript agreed on rejection (which occurred with only 7 percent of manuscripts). The rejection rate was 20 percent even when all reviewers agreed that the manuscript should be accepted (which occurred with 48 percent of manuscripts).

"We need to better understand and improve the reliability of the peer-review process while helping editors, who make the ultimate publish or not publish decision, recognize the limitations of reviewers' recommendations," said Dr. Tierney, who served as JGIM co-editor-in-chief from 2004-2009.

JGIM is a publication of the Society of General Internal Medicine, which funded this study. The journal's editorial office is located at the Regenstrief Institute.

In addition to Dr. Tierney, co-authors of the study are Richard L. Kravitz, M.D., M.S.P.H. and Peter Franks, M.D., of the University of California, Davis; Mitchell D. Feldman, M.D., M.Phil., of the University of California, San Francisco; Martha Gerrity, M.D., Ph.D., of Oregon Health Sciences University and Portland VA Medical Center and Cindy Byrne of the IU School of Medicine and the Regenstrief Institute.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Indiana University School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Richard L. Kravitz, Peter Franks, Mitchell D. Feldman, Martha Gerrity, Cindy Byrne, William M. Tierney, Margaret Sampson. Editorial Peer Reviewers' Recommendations at a General Medical Journal: Are They Reliable and Do Editors Care? PLoS ONE, 2010; 5 (4): e10072 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0010072

Cite This Page:

Indiana University School of Medicine. "To publish or not to publish? That is the question." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100521191442.htm>.
Indiana University School of Medicine. (2010, May 21). To publish or not to publish? That is the question. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100521191442.htm
Indiana University School of Medicine. "To publish or not to publish? That is the question." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100521191442.htm (accessed April 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Science & Society News

Saturday, April 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dispute Flares Over Controversial Thai Temple Tigers

Dispute Flares Over Controversial Thai Temple Tigers

AFP (Apr. 24, 2015) — Thai wildlife officials begin a headcount of nearly 150 tigers kept by monks at a temple which has become the centre of a dispute over the welfare of the animals. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Comcast Drops $45 Billion Time Warner Bid

Comcast Drops $45 Billion Time Warner Bid

AP (Apr. 24, 2015) — Comcast is dropping its $45 billion bid for Time Warner Cable after heavy regulatory pushback. Critics had pointed to higher prices and less choice. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Judge OKs 65-Year Deal Over NFL Concussions

Judge OKs 65-Year Deal Over NFL Concussions

AP (Apr. 23, 2015) — A judge has approved a potential $1 billion plan to resolve thousands of NFL concussion lawsuits filed by retired players. The NFL expects 6,000 of nearly 20,000 retired players to suffer from Alzheimer&apos;s disease or moderate dementia someday.(April 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New DoD Strategy Warns of Cyberwar Capabilities

New DoD Strategy Warns of Cyberwar Capabilities

AP (Apr. 23, 2015) — A new Pentagon cybersecurity strategy lays out for the first time publicly that the U.S. military plans to use cyberwarfare as an option in conflicts with enemies. (April 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins