Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Radiation does not improve survival for rare, invasive bladder cancer, study finds

Date:
June 2, 2010
Source:
Henry Ford Health System
Summary:
In the largest study to date of a rare and deadly form of bladder cancer, researchers found radiation therapy may not improve a patient's chances for survival. While overall survival for adenocarcinoma of the bladder was poor, the study revealed several factors that may improve a patient's prognosis, including being diagnosed at age 60 or younger, and having cystectomy, a procedure that either removes all or a portion of the bladder.

In the largest study to date of a rare and deadly form of bladder cancer, researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit found radiation therapy may not improve a patient's chances for survival.

Related Articles


While overall survival for adenocarcinoma of the bladder was poor, the study revealed several factors that may improve a patient's prognosis, including being diagnosed at age 60 or younger, and having cystectomy, a procedure that either removes all or a portion of the bladder.

"While this malignancy afflicts just one to two percent of people diagnosed with bladder cancer, chances of surviving it for five years are grim -- only 18 percent -- in part because it is usually detected at an advanced stage," says study lead author Naveen Pokala, M.D., an urologist at Henry Ford Hospital.

"By the time the primary cancer is found, it may already have penetrated all four walls of the bladder and spread to adjacent organs and beyond, including the peritoneum, lymph nodes, and lungs."

The study will be presented June 2 at the 2010 American Urology Association's annual meeting in San Francisco.

In 2009, the National Cancer Institute estimated 70,980 new cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed in the U.S., while 14,330 died of the disease. According to the American Cancer Society, only about 1 percent of bladder cancers are adenocarcinomas. It invades the mucous cells in the bladder lining, and is the result of chronic irritation and inflammation. Nearly all adenocarcinomas of the bladder are invasive.

For their study, researchers at Henry Ford Hospital studied more than 850 patients with adenocarcinoma of the bladder, all selected from the National SEER database.

Of the study group, 96 patients had had a partial cystectomy; 164 had a total cystectomy; 375 had an endoscopy procedure; and 202 had an unspecified surgery. Among this group, some patients were treated with radiation therapy.

The population-based study had a mean age of 66.9 years among 514 males and 338 women; 707 were white, 94 African American, and 51 other races.

Race, the year of diagnosis, and radiation therapy did not affect survival.

Their overall survival rate was poor. The factors found in better prognoses were age 60 or younger; a well-differentiated, localized tumor in the dome (top) of the bladder, or the urachus, a vestigial cord that once connected the fetal bladder and contributed to development of the umbilical cord; and a total or partial cystectomy.

In addition to Dr. Pokala, study co-authors at Henry Ford Hospital included James Peabody, M.D.; Hans Stricker, M.D.; Piyush Agarwal, M.D.; and Mani Menon, M.D.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Henry Ford Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Henry Ford Health System. "Radiation does not improve survival for rare, invasive bladder cancer, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100602121054.htm>.
Henry Ford Health System. (2010, June 2). Radiation does not improve survival for rare, invasive bladder cancer, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100602121054.htm
Henry Ford Health System. "Radiation does not improve survival for rare, invasive bladder cancer, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100602121054.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

AP (Oct. 31, 2014) Officials in the Washington area showed off Ebola response measures being taken at Dulles International Airport and the National Institutes of Health. (Oct. 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) NIAID Director Anthony Fauci said the risk of Ebola becoming an epidemic in the U.S. is essentially zero Thursday at the Washington Ideas Forum. He also said an Ebola vaccine will be tested in West Africa in the next few months. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) A nurse who vowed to defy Maine's voluntary quarantine for health care workers who treated Ebola patients followed through on her promise Thursday, leaving her home for an hour-long bike ride. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) Colorado may have legalized marijuana for recreational use, but the debate around the decision still continues, with a recent - failed - attempt to ban cannabis-infused edibles. Duration: 01:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins