Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Online ads can get too close for comfort, says new study

Date:
June 14, 2010
Source:
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management
Summary:
Trying to have an impact in the brave new world of web advertising? You could match an ad to a web page's content -- such as putting a car ad on an auto consumer website. Or, you could make it stand out with eye-catching pop-up graphics and video. But don’t waste your marketing budget putting the two strategies together. The first large-scale study looking at thousands of online ad campaigns says that in combination, these approaches make viewers feel like their privacy is being invaded – and turns them off. But don't waste your marketing budget putting the two strategies together.

Trying to have an impact in the brave new world of web advertising?

You could match an ad to a web page's content -- such as putting a car ad on an auto consumer website. Or, you could make it stand out with eye-catching pop-up graphics and video.

But don't waste your marketing budget putting the two strategies together. The first large-scale study looking at thousands of online ad campaigns says that in combination, these approaches make viewers feel like their privacy is being invaded -- and turns them off.

"Usually more is better," says Avi Goldfarb, an associate professor of marketing at the Rotman School of Management, who wrote the paper with Catherine Tucker of MIT's Sloan School of Business. "If targeting works and visible ads work, you'd think visible, targeted ads would work even better -- but they didn't."

The study, which will be published in a forthcoming issue of Marketing Science, used data from nearly 3,000 web advertising campaigns across a wide variety of product categories. It found that high-visibility ads were associated with better consumer recall, while content-linked ads led to higher consumer purchase plans. But although consumers still had good recall when the strategies were used together, their purchase intentions were worse than if the ad had not been particularly visible at all.

The effect was strongest in more private product categories -- such as financial products -- and among consumers who declined to offer information about their incomes when asked in an online survey. The results may explain the unexpected success of Google AdSense, says the study, which uses unobtrusive text-based ads that are tied to a webpage's content.

At $6 billion U.S. in revenue a year, Google Adsense generates more than half of the total online display market, worth about $11.2 billion.

"Our results show privacy matters in something of a subtle way in online advertising," says Goldfarb. "Sometimes privacy violations are fine, sometimes they're not."

The complete study is available at: http://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/~agoldfarb/GoldfarbTucker-intrusiveness.pdf .


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Avi Goldfarb, Catherine Tucker. Online Display Advertising: Targeting and Obtrusiveness. Marketing Science, 2010; (forthcoming)

Cite This Page:

University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management. "Online ads can get too close for comfort, says new study." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100614074937.htm>.
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management. (2010, June 14). Online ads can get too close for comfort, says new study. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100614074937.htm
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management. "Online ads can get too close for comfort, says new study." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100614074937.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Portable Breathalyzer Gets You Home Safely

Portable Breathalyzer Gets You Home Safely

Buzz60 (Oct. 21, 2014) Breeze, a portable breathalyzer, gets you home safely by instantly showing your blood alcohol content, and with one tap, lets you call an Uber, a cab or a friend from your contact list to pick you up. Sean Dowling (@SeanDowlingTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Birth Season Might Determine Your Temperament

Your Birth Season Might Determine Your Temperament

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) A new study says the season you're born in can determine your temperament — and one season has a surprising outcome. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Movies Might Desensitize Violence For Parents, Not Just Kids

Movies Might Desensitize Violence For Parents, Not Just Kids

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) A study suggests that parents become desensitized to violent movies as well as children, which leads them to allow their kids to view violent films. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins