Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Ongoing pregnancy rates from vitrified eggs as good as those from fresh, study shows

Date:
July 1, 2010
Source:
European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology
Summary:
Embryos derived from oocytes (eggs) cryopreserved by the vitrification method are just as likely to produce an on-going pregnancy as those involving fresh oocytes. These research results will make egg donation both easier and safer in the future.

Embryos derived from oocytes (eggs) cryopreserved by the vitrification method are just as likely to produce an on-going pregnancy as those involving fresh oocytes, according to a presentation at the 26th annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. Dr. Ana Cobo, Cryobiology Unit director at Institut Universitari -- IVI Valencia, Valencia, Spain, told delegates that the results of her team's research would make egg donation both easier and safer in the future.

Related Articles


The scientists carried out a randomised clinical trial involving 600 recipients of either freshly-harvested oocytes or those preserved by the vitrification method, where oocytes are flash-frozen after the extraction of water, hence avoiding ice formation. Analysis of the results found that the on-going pregnancy rate in women who had received vitrified oocytes was 43.7% as opposed to 41.7% in the fresh oocyte group. The proportion of top-quality embryos was similar between the two groups, and there was also no difference in age or other demographic characteristics and the incidence of male factor infertility.

"Because we were able to show that there were no differences between the two groups before embryo implantation," said Dr. Cobo, "we can be certain that the on-going pregnancy rates in both groups were not influenced by any factor other than the method of oocyte preservation. Although there has been considerable circumstantial evidence that cryopreservation by the vitrification method produces results as good as those with freshly-harvested oocytes, until this trial there was still a lack of large randomly-controlled studies in the field."

The researchers say that their results will have a significant effect on the practice of egg-banking in the future. "Many patients will be able to benefit," said Dr. Cobo. "For example, there are cancer patients who will be able to preserve their fertility before undergoing treatment that can make them sterile, patients who would be at risk of ovarian hyperstimulation, and those where a semen sample is not immediately available."

Once an egg donor is recruited and screened she undergoes ovarian stimulation to produce a number of oocytes, which are then retrieved. The oocytes then need to be fertilised by the sperm of the male partner of the recipient and the best embryos thus produced are placed in the uterus of the recipient, whose uterine lining has been previously prepared to be ready to receive the embryo.

When using fresh oocytes, the need for synchronisation of all these procedures is paramount, but not always possible. Egg banking precludes the need to synchronise these timings, which can also be the cause of long delays.

"As well as being able to shorten or even eliminate the current long waiting lists, egg banking also offers a safer donation process because it allows oocytes to be quarantined while the absence of any contagious disease in the donor is confirmed," said Dr. Cobo. "Until now we have been unable to do this with any certainty."

The scientists now intend to continue their research by following up the progress of babies born after oocyte vitrification. "We need to ascertain that there are no adverse effects on children conceived from cryopreserved oocytes," said Dr. Cobo, "so we will compare obstetric and neonatal data from babies born after oocyte vitrification with those resulting from the replacement of embryos originating from fresh oocytes. Having made sure that the pregnancies are safe, it is important to ensure that pregnancy outcomes are also free from harm."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. "Ongoing pregnancy rates from vitrified eggs as good as those from fresh, study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100630071142.htm>.
European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. (2010, July 1). Ongoing pregnancy rates from vitrified eggs as good as those from fresh, study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100630071142.htm
European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. "Ongoing pregnancy rates from vitrified eggs as good as those from fresh, study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100630071142.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Bupa is hoping to expand in India&apos;s fast-growing health insurance market, once a rule change on foreign investment is implemented. The British private healthcare group&apos;s CEO tells Grace Pascoe why it&apos;s so keen on the new opportunity. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Mobile apps are turning smartphones into a personal doctors, with users able to measure heart rate, blood pressure and even blood sugar. But will it change our behaviour? Ivor Bennett reports from the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) AbbVie announced Wednesday it will buy cancer drugmaker Pharmacyclics in a $21 billion deal. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toddlers Drinking Coffee? Why You Shouldn't Share Your Joe

Toddlers Drinking Coffee? Why You Shouldn't Share Your Joe

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) A survey of Boston mothers and toddlers found that 15 percent of two-year-olds drink coffee and 2.5 percent of 1-year-olds. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins