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Birth dates, school enrollment dates affect ADHD diagnosis rates, study shows

Date:
August 17, 2010
Source:
North Carolina State University
Summary:
Rising rates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and large differences in diagnosis rates have led to fears that the condition is often being misdiagnosed. A new study demonstrates that these concerns are justified. Researchers found large discrepancies in diagnosis and treatment rates based on small differences in children's dates of birth.

Rising rates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and large differences in diagnosis rates have led to fears that the condition is often being misdiagnosed. A new study from North Carolina State University demonstrates that these concerns are justified. The researchers found large discrepancies in diagnosis and treatment rates based on small differences in children's dates of birth.

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"The question we asked was whether children who are relatively young compared to their classroom peers were more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD," says Dr. Melinda Morrill, a research assistant professor of economics at NC State and co-author of a paper describing the study. "To answer the question, we looked at children born shortly before the kindergarten eligibility cutoff date and children born shortly after the cutoff date and compared the rates of ADHD diagnosis and treatment."

The researchers figured that children born just a few days apart should have the same underlying risk of having ADHD. So finding a significant difference in diagnosis rates between children born only a few days apart is strong evidence of medically inappropriate diagnosis.

Morrill explains that the study shows that children born just after the kindergarten cutoff date were 25 percent less likely to be diagnosed as having ADHD than children born just before the cutoff date. "This indicates that there are children who are diagnosed (or not) because of something other than underlying biological or medical reasons.

"We believe that younger children may be mistakenly diagnosed as having ADHD, when in fact they are simply less mature," Morrill says.

Morrill stresses that "we are not downplaying the existence or significance of ADHD in children. What our research shows is that similar students have significantly different diagnosis rates depending on when their birthday falls in relation to the school year."

For the study, the researchers examined data from two national health surveys and a national private health insurance claims database to evaluate rates of ADHD diagnosis and treatment in children. The data sources covered different time periods ranging from 1996 to 2006.

The paper was co-authored by Morrill, Dr. William N. Evans of the University of Notre Dame, and Stephen T. Parente of the University of Minnesota.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by North Carolina State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Evans et al. Measuring Inappropriate Medical Diagnosis and Treatment in Survey Data: The Case of ADHD among School-Age Children. Journal of Health Economics, 2010; DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2010.07.005

Cite This Page:

North Carolina State University. "Birth dates, school enrollment dates affect ADHD diagnosis rates, study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817090802.htm>.
North Carolina State University. (2010, August 17). Birth dates, school enrollment dates affect ADHD diagnosis rates, study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817090802.htm
North Carolina State University. "Birth dates, school enrollment dates affect ADHD diagnosis rates, study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817090802.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

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