Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Heavy drug-use among bad boys curbed by parental monitoring and peers

Date:
August 17, 2010
Source:
University of Montreal
Summary:
Aggressive and hyperactive boys with low parental monitoring are more likely to befriend deviant peers and become heavy drug users as teens, according to a new study. Yet the investigation found that 'bad boys' can be protected from heavy substance use as teenagers if they are highly monitored and befriend 'good boys' as children.

Aggressive and hyperactive boys with low parental monitoring are more likely to befriend deviant peers and become heavy drug users as teens, according to a new study published in the journal Addictive Behaviors. Yet the investigation by scientists from the Université de Montréal and Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center found that 'bad boys' can be protected from heavy substance use as teenagers if they are highly monitored and befriend 'good boys' as children.

Parental monitoring was shown to have a protective effect on bad boys and reduce their affiliation with deviant peers, says first author, Jean-Sébastien Fallu, a Université de Montréal psycho-education professor."Disruptive boys typically show a proneness to act aggressively and impulsively -- these adolescents might need more external constraints from parents as compared to others who have stronger internal control."

Co-author Richard Tremblay, a Université de Montréal professor of pediatrics, psychiatry and psychology and a researcher at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center, says aggressive children are more inclined to misuse drugs than their non aggressive counterparts and this risk increases substantially if they also affiliate with deviant friends. "Deviant peers often affiliate with each other and mutually influence each other through deviancy training," says Dr. Tremblay, who is also founding director of Montreal's Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development.

The study used data from a long-term investigation that followed children from low socioeconomic backgrounds and from kindergarten through adolescence. "Another finding of our study was that disruptive boys who were highly monitored -- yet poorly attached to parents -- were heavier drug users," continues Dr. Tremblay.

Conversely, says Dr. Fallu, "Well monitored disruptive boys are more prone to affiliate with conventional peers. When such boys affiliate with conventional peers, they might benefit from a positive socializing influence or conformity training."

This study was funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the National Health Research and Development Program and the Fonds de recherche sur la société et la culture.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Montreal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Fallu et al. Preventing disruptive boys from becoming heavy substance users during adolescence: A longitudinal study of familial and peer-related protective factors. Addictive Behaviors, 2010; DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2010.07.008

Cite This Page:

University of Montreal. "Heavy drug-use among bad boys curbed by parental monitoring and peers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817103354.htm>.
University of Montreal. (2010, August 17). Heavy drug-use among bad boys curbed by parental monitoring and peers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817103354.htm
University of Montreal. "Heavy drug-use among bad boys curbed by parental monitoring and peers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817103354.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) — A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

Newsy (July 25, 2014) — An online quiz from a required course at Ohio State is making waves for suggesting atheists are inherently smarter than Christians. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) — A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) — The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins