Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

First UK cameras to scan the night skies

Date:
September 9, 2010
Source:
University of Hertfordshire
Summary:
An astronomy graduate has set up the first UK camera which can continuously scan the night sky and dictates the best conditions for surveys.

David Campbell with the All-Sky camera.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Hertfordshire

An astronomy graduate at the University of Hertfordshire has set up the first UK camera which can continuously scan the night sky and dictates the best conditions for surveys.

David Campbell, an Astrophysics graduate at the University, who collects meteorites as a hobby, set up the camera at Bayfordbury Observatory in October 2009 and has captured some interesting data since then.

The All-Sky camera records images of the entire sky continuously throughout the night. One of the main aims of the camera is to detect clouds above the observatory so that researchers can monitor sky conditions and gauge the best time to scan the sky.

The camera is an SBIG AllSky-340C, containing a highly sensitive Kodak 640x480 pixel CCD and a Fujinon 1.4mm f1.4 fisheye lens giving horizon to horizon coverage.

David's project is the first known attempt at automating the detection of clouds at night from such a camera and he has come up with findings that suggest that Sunday nights are four times clearer than Tuesdays nights, although more surveying is needed to confirm this categorically.

The Bayfordbury camera has already detected twenty-six potential fireballs, and a few actual fireballs from the recent Perseid meteor shower. Another camera has been set up at Hemel Hempstead and one at the Isle of Wight and a camera is currently being set up in Norfolk, which means that very soon the astronomers will be in a position to triangulate the path of an incoming meteor and help in the recovery of meteorites.

"We could be filming a supernova before we know it," said David. "The All-Sky cameras give us a complete record of the sky, not just a compressed picture. No one has surveyed the night sky over the UK like this before."

The AllSky camera website can be found at: http://star.herts.ac.uk/allsky


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Hertfordshire. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Hertfordshire. "First UK cameras to scan the night skies." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100909074013.htm>.
University of Hertfordshire. (2010, September 9). First UK cameras to scan the night skies. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100909074013.htm
University of Hertfordshire. "First UK cameras to scan the night skies." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100909074013.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Japan Looks To Faster Future As Bullet Train Turns 50

Japan Looks To Faster Future As Bullet Train Turns 50

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) Japan's bullet train turns 50 Wednesday. Here's a look at how it's changed over half a century — and the changes it's inspired globally. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
US Police Put Body Cameras to the Test

US Police Put Body Cameras to the Test

AFP (Oct. 1, 2014) Police body cameras are gradually being rolled out across the US, with interest surging after the fatal police shooting in August of an unarmed black teenager. Duration: 02:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Japan Celebrates 'bullet Train' Anniversary

Raw: Japan Celebrates 'bullet Train' Anniversary

AP (Oct. 1, 2014) A ceremony marking 50 years since Japan launched its Shinkansen bullet train was held on Wednesday in Tokyo. The latest model can travel from Tokyo to Osaka, a distance of 319 miles, in two hours and 25 minutes. (Oct. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins