Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Novel biomarker may predict response to new VEGF receptor inhibitor

Date:
September 28, 2010
Source:
American Association for Cancer Research
Summary:
Researchers believe there may be a way to predict, based on individual tumors, those patients that are more likely to respond to the investigational new drug tivozanib.

Researchers believe there may be a way to predict, based on individual tumors, those patients that are more likely to respond to the investigational new drug tivozanib.

This is possible, the researchers from AVEO Pharmaceuticals, Inc. said, because they have used a new way of creating animal tumor models that mimic tumor variation seen in human. Based on the results of these studies, they have found a single biomarker that may predict resistance to tivozanib, an oral, triple VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) receptor inhibitor.

Tivozanib is in an ongoing Phase III registration trial in kidney cancer, which recently completed enrollment of 500 patients ahead of schedule, and is in multiple early trials in patients with breast, colon and lung cancer.

In a study being presented at the Fourth AACR International Conference on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development, the researchers said that the biomarker reflects the presence of certain white blood cells inside a tumor.

"Predictive biomarkers that can be used to assess activity of treatments are what we are all striving for in cancer therapy today," said Murray Robinson, Ph.D., senior vice president, translational medicine, at AVEO Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Cambridge, Mass. "We want to know in advance which patients are most likely to respond to an anticancer therapy, and in this way, spare patients who cannot respond from ineffective therapy."

In its ongoing trials, the company is collecting biomarker data in order to correlate the presence of the biomarker with clinical activity. "This is a necessary step that we must do to validate the predictive value of the biomarker," Robinson said.

To date, the researchers have evaluated 600 human tumor samples across eight different tumor types.

"We saw the biomarker in subsets of all the human tumor types we looked at. Based on these findings, we believe that the biomarker discovered in our animal models may be replicated in human tumors, and may be an important discovery relevant to patient care," said Robinson.

At the AACR conference, Robinson showed that the same biomarker identified in AVEO's breast tumor model was associated with clinical activity in a set of kidney tumor patients from a previous Phase II kidney cancer trial. This biomarker is associated with white blood immune cells that are recruited into the tumor to produce angiogenic growth factors.

"This produces an intrinsic resistance to tivozanib, which is an anti-angiogenesis agent," Robinson said.

The researchers inserted specific oncogenes and other engineered genes altered in numerous cancer types into the tissue of animals and then studied the variety of tumors that were produced. For example, genetically altering the HER2 gene resulted in tumors that naturally expressed different pathways for growth, Robinson said.

"That mimics what happens in women with HER2-positive breast cancer because across patients, there is a significant variation in these HER2 tumors that dramatically alters their response to treatment," he said.

After molecularly characterizing each tumor, they tested what happened when the cancer was treated.

"Because we have the molecular character of the tumor, we can associate biology with response. We have an ongoing effort to discover and develop predictive biomarkers that will aid our clinical development strategies and, we believe, maximize the benefit for specific patient populations," Robinson said.

In this way the researchers isolated tumors that do not respond to tivozanib, and from this they were able to identify the resistant biological phenotype. Further study revealed a correlation between the biomarkers and tivozanib clinical activity.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Association for Cancer Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Association for Cancer Research. "Novel biomarker may predict response to new VEGF receptor inhibitor." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928101419.htm>.
American Association for Cancer Research. (2010, September 28). Novel biomarker may predict response to new VEGF receptor inhibitor. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928101419.htm
American Association for Cancer Research. "Novel biomarker may predict response to new VEGF receptor inhibitor." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928101419.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) Nine-month-old Wyatt Scott was born with a rare disorder called congenital trismus, which prevents him from opening his mouth. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins