Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Depression and distress is not detected in the majority of patients seen by nurses, study suggests

Date:
October 4, 2010
Source:
University of Leicester
Summary:
New research reveals that nursing staff have ‘considerable difficulty’ detecting depression and distress in patients.

New research from the University of Leicester reveals that nursing staff have 'considerable difficulty' detecting depression and distress in patients.

Two new research studies led by Dr Alex Mitchell, consultant in psycho-oncology at Leicestershire Partnership Trust and honorary senior lecturer at the University of Leicester, highlight the fact that while nurses are at the front line of caring for people, they receive little training in mental health.

The researchers call for the development of short, simple methods to identify mood problems as a way of providing more targeted and appropriate treatment for patients.

Dr Mitchell, of the Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine at the University of Leicester, said: "In terms of dealing with distress and depression, nursing staff are probably the most important group of health professionals.

"In the NHS 400,000 nurses provide valuable support to those suffering a range a physical and mental illnesses but struggle to detect depression in the early stages. Nurses are often very capable of forming good therapeutic relationships and provide a great deal of psychological support which is highly valued. However their ability to do this is increasingly under-pressure from high workloads and little funding for professional development.

"Our first analysis found that 7000 nurses and nursing assistants often overlooked depression in clinical settings. Nurses working in hospital settings and nursing homes correctly identified about 4 out of 10 people with depression and practice nurses working in primary care correctly identified only one in four people with depression."

A second study examined the ability of nurses to detect distressed patients and found half were missed until distress became severe.

Dr Mitchell said the research discovered a number of reasons that accounted for this situation: "Factors that appear to be influential include greater empathy, more confidence with mental health and more time spent with patients. However most nursing staff receive little training in mental health and report low experience in this area. It may be unrealistic to expect nurses to remember complex criteria for detection of depression or to apply lengthy screening tools. In the future we may focus more on who has impaired function and who needs help rather than depression alone."

Dr Mitchell's team is working on short, simple methods to identify mood problems and these can be freely accessed at www.psycho-oncology.info/


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Leicester. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Alex J. Mitchell, Venkatraghavan Kakkadasam. Ability of nurses to identify depression in primary care, secondary care and nursing homes—A meta-analysis of routine clinical accuracy. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 2010; DOI: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2010.05.012
  2. Alex J. Mitchell, Nadia Hussain, Lorraine Grainger, Paul Symonds. Identification of patient-reported distress by clinical nurse specialists in routine oncology practice: a multicentre UK study. Psycho-Oncology, 2010; DOI: 10.1002/pon.1815

Cite This Page:

University of Leicester. "Depression and distress is not detected in the majority of patients seen by nurses, study suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101004101443.htm>.
University of Leicester. (2010, October 4). Depression and distress is not detected in the majority of patients seen by nurses, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101004101443.htm
University of Leicester. "Depression and distress is not detected in the majority of patients seen by nurses, study suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101004101443.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Peace Corps is one of several U.S.-based organizations to pull workers out of West Africa because of the Ebola outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Health officials say 2,000 deaths occur each year in the U.S. due to weather, but it's excessive heat and cold that claim the most lives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins