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How oscillators -- common electronic components -- get in sync or fall out of sync

Date:
November 8, 2010
Source:
American Institute of Physics
Summary:
Understanding conditions that cause oscillators to fall in or out of synchronization is necessary to achieve the optimal functioning of oscillator networks that underlie many technologies. The transition from synchronization to desynchronization is the subject of a new investigation by a team of Japanese scientists.

We talk about synchronization a lot. We sync up; sync our computers; and get in sync. And synchronous behavior underlies many natural systems, events and phenomena.

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Understanding conditions that cause oscillators -- which are common electronic components that produce a repetitive electronic signal -- to get in sync or fall out of sync, is necessary to achieve the optimal functioning of oscillator networks that underlie many technologies.

The transition from synchronization to desynchronization is the subject of a new investigation by a team of Japanese scientists. Their report appears in the journal CHAOS, which is published by the American Institute of Physics.

"On one hand, synchronization is necessary for communication and information processing. On the other hand, synchronization can blow violently out of proportion and enslave everything it is in contact with," explains Ralf Toenjes of Ochanomizu University.

He and his colleagues show that adding only a few links to a network can have such a strong effect that even this modest addition can mark the difference between random noise and coherent synchronization. They devised a method of control that enables them to balance the system at states that are actually unstable and usually not observed.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Institute of Physics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ralf Tönjes, Naoki Masuda, Hiroshi Kori. Synchronization transition of identical phase oscillators in a directed small-world network. Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, 2010; 20 (3): 033108 DOI: 10.1063/1.3476316

Cite This Page:

American Institute of Physics. "How oscillators -- common electronic components -- get in sync or fall out of sync." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101019171809.htm>.
American Institute of Physics. (2010, November 8). How oscillators -- common electronic components -- get in sync or fall out of sync. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101019171809.htm
American Institute of Physics. "How oscillators -- common electronic components -- get in sync or fall out of sync." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101019171809.htm (accessed November 29, 2014).

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