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New software eases analysis of insect in motion

Date:
October 30, 2010
Source:
Case Western Reserve University
Summary:
Researchers are using two high-speed cameras and a computer program they developed to quickly and accurately analyze the simultaneous movement of all 26 leg joints in a walking cockroach. They have made the program free and open-source for other insect researchers to use.

Cockroaches can skitter through a crowded under-the-sink cabinet, eluding capture or worse, making the insects a model for rescue robots that would creep through the debris of disaster in search of survivors.

But learning how they use all six legs at the same time to walk, run and turn has been a difficult and time-consuming task. Until now.

Using a pair of high-speed cameras and a custom computer program, researchers at Case Western Reserve University are able to simultaneously extract three-dimensional movement of a cockroach's 26 leg joints. They report their findings in the online journal PLoS ONE.

"Each leg does something a little different but in concert," said John Bender, a postdoctoral research associate in the department of biology and lead author of the study. A cockroach doesn't inch ahead on the push of one leg. So, to understand just one step requires a synchronous picture of what each joint in each leg is doing as the insect propels forward.

The new technology allowed Bender and his collaborators to provide the first detailed analysis of how the cockroach uses the tiny trampoline-like trochanter-femur joint that lies between the stubby coxa and long femur.

The analysis showed the joint reduces bouncing as the body's weight shifts forward, and then rolls to lift the tibia off the ground as the leg begins its forward swing.

Bender, biology professor Roy Ritzmann and undergraduate researcher Elaine Simpson, who has since graduated, used synchronized digital high-speed cameras to produce 3-D images of the leg joints of a moving cockroach. The cameras shoot 500 frames per second for 8 seconds.

Bender led development of software that enabled them to analyze in hours 106,496 individual 3-D points, with about 90 percent accuracy. He estimated that the old method of analyzing the 3-D movement of all 26 joints frame-by-frame would take at least a couple of weeks. By automating much of the work, the team sought also to eliminate some of the subjectivity of analyzing each frame by human eye.

The researchers say the software can benefit others who seek to analyze movement of other insects and have made the software free and open-source for other investigators to use and add enhancements. Bender and Ritzman are using the software now to study changes in coordination that occur during changes in walking speed and turning.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Case Western Reserve University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Björn Brembs, John A. Bender, Elaine M. Simpson, Roy E. Ritzmann. Computer-Assisted 3D Kinematic Analysis of All Leg Joints in Walking Insects. PLoS ONE, 2010; 5 (10): e13617 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0013617

Cite This Page:

Case Western Reserve University. "New software eases analysis of insect in motion." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101027124757.htm>.
Case Western Reserve University. (2010, October 30). New software eases analysis of insect in motion. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101027124757.htm
Case Western Reserve University. "New software eases analysis of insect in motion." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101027124757.htm (accessed April 21, 2014).

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