Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New method helps stroke patients recover short term hand control; brain stimulation and practice ease paralysis of wrist and fingers

Date:
November 16, 2010
Source:
Society for Neuroscience
Summary:
People paralyzed by stroke temporarily regained the use of their hands after weeks of brain stimulation and physical therapy, according to new research. Stroke patients -- who often struggle to unfurl their hand rather than to crook it -- increased their range of motion for at least two weeks after completing the therapy.

People paralyzed by stroke temporarily regained the use of their hands after weeks of brain stimulation and physical therapy, according to new research. Stroke patients -- who often struggle to unfurl their hand rather than to crook it -- increased their range of motion for at least two weeks after completing the therapy.

Related Articles


Details of the new approach were presented at Neuroscience 2010, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, held in San Diego.

Stroke is the leading cause of disability in adults worldwide. Only a few people ever recover completely, and many have limited abilities for years. One of the results of stroke is often abnormally increased muscle tension in addition to weakness or paralysis in one side of the body. This study could offer disabled individuals a new hybrid form of rehab.

"Our results show a novel rehabilitative approach that takes advantage of the brain's ability to change and acquire new motor skills by practicing to overcome abnormal muscle tension," said lead author Satoko Koganemaru, MD, PhD, of Kyoto University in Japan.

Nine individuals with moderate-to-severe paralysis underwent the dual treatment for six weeks. Koganemaru and her colleagues applied high-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation -- a noninvasive method sometimes used to treat depression -- over the damaged side of the brain, specifically in the area associated with motor control. Over the same period of time, the participants practiced contracting the muscles for extension of their fingers and wrists. At the end of the trial, the volunteers could grip and pinch objects.

"The improvements suggest that the brain adapts through practice and brain stimulation, making for better control of muscles," Koganemaru said. "This method could be a powerful approach for people with stroke and might be applied to other movement disorders."

Research was supported by the Strategic Research Program for Brain Sciences of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and by a grant for Longevity Sciences from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Neuroscience. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Neuroscience. "New method helps stroke patients recover short term hand control; brain stimulation and practice ease paralysis of wrist and fingers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101116102552.htm>.
Society for Neuroscience. (2010, November 16). New method helps stroke patients recover short term hand control; brain stimulation and practice ease paralysis of wrist and fingers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101116102552.htm
Society for Neuroscience. "New method helps stroke patients recover short term hand control; brain stimulation and practice ease paralysis of wrist and fingers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101116102552.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Yoga can help your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and heart just as much as biking and walking does, a new study suggests. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
1st Responders Trained for Autism Sensitivity

1st Responders Trained for Autism Sensitivity

AP (Dec. 16, 2014) More departments are ordering their first responders to sit in on training sessions that focus on how to more effectively interact with those with autism spectrum disorder (Dec. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Guys Are Idiots, According To Sarcastic Study

Guys Are Idiots, According To Sarcastic Study

Newsy (Dec. 12, 2014) A study out of Britain suggest men are more idiotic than women based on the rate of accidental deaths and other factors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Believing in Father Christmas Good for Children's Imaginations

Believing in Father Christmas Good for Children's Imaginations

AFP (Dec. 12, 2014) As the countdown to Christmas gets underway, so too does the Father Christmas conspiracy. But psychologists say that telling our children about Santa, flying reindeer and elves is good for their imaginations. Duration: 01:57 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins