Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Online map of maternal health to inform and influence world leaders

Date:
November 19, 2010
Source:
University of Southampton
Summary:
Researchers have helped construct an online interactive world map which gives stark facts and figures about the health of women during pregnancy, childbirth and following the birth of their child.

An emergency Caesarean paid for by UNICEF saved the lives of Deka and Mohammed of Kenya.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Southampton

Researchers from the University of Southampton have helped construct an online interactive world map which gives stark facts and figures about the health of women during pregnancy, childbirth and following the birth of their child.

Related Articles


Social scientists Professor Zoë Matthews and Dr Sarah Neal are working in collaboration with the White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood and the University of Aberdeen on a joint project worth in excess of £160,000 called 'The Atlas of Birth', which also includes a book, short film and flyers.

"We are using data from the United Nations and the World Health Organization to give a comprehensive picture of maternal health from around the world. Part of the project involves presenting the information in an easy-to-use online map, to help get key facts direct to policymakers," comments Professor Matthews of the University's Centre for Global Health, Population, Poverty and Policy.

Funded by the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health and the Norwegian government, the project includes statistics on a wide range of issues including maternal deaths, pregnancies to very young girls and midwife contact.

Latest figures from the WHO show more than 99 percent of maternal deaths occur in developing countries and most of these in a handful of nations. Most of the very high rates of death are seen in sub-Saharan Africa, but India has the highest number of deaths, with 63,000 women dying every year.

Women in developing countries often become a mother very young, experience many closely spaced births, and run a risk as high as one in 11 of dying in childbirth across their lifetimes. In particular, girls under the age of 15 are five times more likely to die giving birth than women in their 20s.

Care from a midwife or professional with midwifery skills during birth is key to saving lives of both mothers and newborns. Despite this, the figures show two thirds of women in the poorest countries deliver without a midwife or other health worker.

"This interactive map will enable advocates across the world to quickly and effectively lobby governments, influence policymakers and inform the media, as public pressure grows to end the tragic and almost always preventable deaths of girls and women in childbirth," comments Brigid McConville, Director of the WRA in the UK.

The new online world map was unveiled at the PMNCH Partner's Forum in Delhi, India (Nov 2010). To view the online version of the 'Atlas of Birth', please go to this address: www.atlasofbirth.com/index.php


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Southampton. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Southampton. "Online map of maternal health to inform and influence world leaders." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101119083230.htm>.
University of Southampton. (2010, November 19). Online map of maternal health to inform and influence world leaders. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101119083230.htm
University of Southampton. "Online map of maternal health to inform and influence world leaders." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101119083230.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Science & Society News

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Excuses, Excuses: Weirdest Reasons People Give For Tardiness

Excuses, Excuses: Weirdest Reasons People Give For Tardiness

Newsy (Jan. 30, 2015) — CareerBuilder surveyed around 5,000 workers and human resources managers nationwide to compile a list of strange excuses employees used when tardy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 30, 2015) — The CDC is urging people to get vaccinated for measles amid an outbreak that began at Disneyland and has now infected more than 90 people. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama To Outline New Plan For Personalized Medicine

Obama To Outline New Plan For Personalized Medicine

Newsy (Jan. 30, 2015) — President Obama is expected to speak with drugmakers Friday about his Precision Medicine Initiative first introduced last week. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google Forced To Obey Law, Changes U.K. Privacy Policy

Google Forced To Obey Law, Changes U.K. Privacy Policy

Newsy (Jan. 30, 2015) — Google has agreed to make its privacy policy more transparent in compliance with a U.K. law. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins