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Walk places, meet people, and build social capital

Date:
December 7, 2010
Source:
Springer Science+Business Media
Summary:
Living in an area where amenities of daily life – groceries, playgrounds, post offices, libraries and restaurants – are within walking distance promotes healthy lifestyles and has positive implications for the environment, research has established. Now, new research has linked walkable neighborhoods with an increase in social benefits as well.

Living in an area where amenities of daily life – groceries, playgrounds, post offices, libraries and restaurants – are within walking distance promotes healthy lifestyles and has positive implications for the environment, research has established. Now, new research from the University of New Hampshire has linked walkable neighborhoods with an increase in social benefits as well.

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The research is published online in Springer's journal Applied Research in Quality of Life.

A walkable community provides residents with easy access to post offices, town parks and playgrounds, coffee shops, restaurants, barbershops and club meeting venues. The ability to walk to these important locations in one's home neighborhood has been linked to a higher quality of life.

Social capital, a measure of an individual's or group's networks, personal connections, and community involvement, brings benefits such as reduced isolation, career connections, and neighborhood safety. What Rogers and her team's work suggests is that it is these benefits -- facilitated by living in a walkable community -- that enhance an individual's quality of life.

For their main study, the authors selected two municipalities in the state of New Hampshire. Ten neighborhoods were chosen in each of the cities and a total of 700 residents took part in the survey. They were asked about the number of locations they could walk to in their community to assess the level of walkability, as well as their trust in the local community, participation in community activities and socializing with friends -- all measures of social capital.

On the whole, the more walkable neighborhoods scored higher on every measure of social capital than the less walkable neighborhoods. The authors found that individuals in more walkable neighborhoods tended to have higher levels of trust and community involvement, whether that was working on a community project, attending a club meeting, volunteering, or simply entertaining friends at home. Residents in the more walkable neighborhoods also reported being in good health and happy more often than those in the less walkable neighborhoods.

The authors conclude: "Walkability has been linked to quality of life in other studies. Walkability may also enhance social capital by providing the means and locations for individuals to connect, share information, and interact with those that they might not otherwise meet. The links we found between walkability and measures of social capital in this study provide further evidence for the consideration of social capital as a key component of quality of life."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Springer Science+Business Media. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Shannon H. Rogers, John M. Halstead, Kevin H. Gardner, Cynthia H. Carlson. Examining Walkability and Social Capital as Indicators of Quality of Life at the Municipal and Neighborhood Scales. Applied Research in Quality of Life, 2010; DOI: 10.1007/s11482-010-9132-4

Cite This Page:

Springer Science+Business Media. "Walk places, meet people, and build social capital." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 December 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101207092429.htm>.
Springer Science+Business Media. (2010, December 7). Walk places, meet people, and build social capital. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101207092429.htm
Springer Science+Business Media. "Walk places, meet people, and build social capital." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101207092429.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

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