Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Adding ipilimumab to standard chemotherapy treatment for late-stage lung cancer may improve survival

Date:
December 9, 2010
Source:
American Society for Radiation Oncology
Summary:
Ipilimumab used in combination with paclitaxel/carboplatin for stage IIIb/IV non-small cell lung cancer showed superior results in progression free survival when compared to paclitaxel/carboplatin alone, according to new research.

Ipilimumab used in combination with paclitaxel/carboplatin for stage IIIb/IV non-small cell lung cancer showed superior results in progression free survival when compared to paclitaxel/carboplatin alone, according to research presented at the 2010 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

This symposium is sponsored by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (ISLAC) and the University of Chicago.

Paclitaxel/carboplatin are commonly used chemotherapy drugs in lung cancer patients. Ipilimumab is a human monoclonal antibody that is used to activate the immune system. It works by blinding to and blocking the activity of CTLA-4, a molecule on T-cells that is thought to play a large role in regulating natural immune responses, which as a result sustains an active immune response when attacking cancer cells.

Researchers in this randomized phase II trial sought to determine if adding ipilimumab to treatments for stage IIIb/IV lung cancer patients would impact overall survival and progression free survival. Over 200 patients were treated using ipilimumab plus a concurrent schedule of paclitaxel/carboplatin, ipilimumab plus a phased schedule of paclitaxel/carboplatin or paclitaxel/carboplatin alone.

With both schedules, using ipilimumab in combination with paclitaxel/carboplatin showed improved progression free survival rates when compared to paclitaxel/carboplatin alone. The phased schedule did show better efficacy than the concurrent schedule, but in no instance did ipilimumab increase paclitaxel/carboplatin related toxicity.

"Phase III and IV lung cancers do not often see positive end results, so there is a lot of room to improve treatments for this disease," Thomas Lynch, M.D., lead author of the study, a professor of medicine at Yale University in New Haven, Conn., and director of the Yale Cancer Center, said. "Ipilimumab is one of the few immunotherapies that have shown positive results in treating lung cancers, and if adding this to standard treatments can improve survival, then it is worth further trials."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Radiation Oncology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society for Radiation Oncology. "Adding ipilimumab to standard chemotherapy treatment for late-stage lung cancer may improve survival." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 December 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101209101400.htm>.
American Society for Radiation Oncology. (2010, December 9). Adding ipilimumab to standard chemotherapy treatment for late-stage lung cancer may improve survival. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101209101400.htm
American Society for Radiation Oncology. "Adding ipilimumab to standard chemotherapy treatment for late-stage lung cancer may improve survival." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101209101400.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) The ebola virus outbreak in West Africa is now linked to 121 deaths. Health officials fear the virus will continue to spread in urban areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) A new study out of Canada says cognitive motor performance begins deteriorating around age 24. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Mt. Everest Helped Scientists Research Diabetes

How Mt. Everest Helped Scientists Research Diabetes

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) British researchers were able to use Mount Everest's low altitudes to study insulin resistance. They hope to find ways to treat diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins