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Medicare payments for medical imaging are higher to nonradiologist physicians than to radiologists

Date:
January 4, 2011
Source:
American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society
Summary:
Researchers have found that Medicare payments for non-invasive medical imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans, are now higher to non-radiologists than to radiologists, according to a new study.
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Researchers have found that Medicare payments for non-invasive medical imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans, are now higher to non-radiologists than to radiologists, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

"Radiologists have always been considered the physicians who "control" non-invasive diagnostic imaging (NDI) and are primarily responsible for its growth. Yet non-radiologists have become increasingly aggressive in their performance and interpretation of imaging," said David C. Levin, MD, lead author of the study.

Researchers looked at Medicare Part B files covering all fee-for-service physician payments for 1998 to 2008. They selected all codes for discretionary NDI. "We found that the growth in fee-for-service payments to non-radiologists for NDI was considerably more rapid than the growth for radiologists between 1998 and 2006," said Levin.

In 1998, overall Part B payments to radiologists for discretionary NDI were $2.563 billion, compared with $2.020 billion to non-radiologists. In 2008, non-radiologists received $4.807 billion for discretionary NDI, and radiologists received $4.648 billion.

"Our data reveal the somewhat surprising finding that non-radiologist physicians are now paid more for NDI by Medicare than radiologists. This has come about because of more rapid growth in fee-for-service payments to non-radiologists between 1998 and 2006, followed by steeper losses among radiologists after implementation of the DRA in 2007," he said.

"Because most imaging by non-radiologists is self-referred, whereas radiologists generally do not have the opportunity to self-refer, this should be of interest and concern to policy makers and payers," said Levin.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. David C. Levin, Vijay M. Rao, Laurence Parker, Andrea J. Frangos, Jonathan H. Sunshine. Medicare Payments for Noninvasive Diagnostic Imaging Are Now Higher to Nonradiologist Physicians Than to Radiologists. Journal of the American College of Radiology - January, 2011; 8 (1): 26-32 DOI: 10.1016/j.jacr.2010.06.027

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American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. "Medicare payments for medical imaging are higher to nonradiologist physicians than to radiologists." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 January 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110104064025.htm>.
American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. (2011, January 4). Medicare payments for medical imaging are higher to nonradiologist physicians than to radiologists. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110104064025.htm
American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. "Medicare payments for medical imaging are higher to nonradiologist physicians than to radiologists." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110104064025.htm (accessed June 30, 2015).

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