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Snakes and spiders: Revealing the wiring that allows us to adapt to the unexpected

Date:
January 31, 2011
Source:
Elsevier
Summary:
Wouldn't life be easy if everything happened as we anticipated? In reality, our brains are able to adapt to the unexpected using an inbuilt network that makes predictions about the world and monitors how those predictions turn out. An area at the front of the brain, called the orbitofrontal cortex, plays a central role and studies have shown that patients with damage to this area confuse memories with reality and continue to anticipate events that are no longer likely to happen. The brain's ability to react adaptively, becomes crucial for survival, when faced with potential dangers, such as snakes and spiders, so to what extent does the harmfulness of an anticipated outcome affect our brain's event monitoring system? Not at all, reveals a new study: the processes are the same, regardless how scary the anticipated event.

Wouldn't life be easy if everything happened as we anticipated? In reality, our brains are able to adapt to the unexpected using an inbuilt network that makes predictions about the world and monitors how those predictions turn out. An area at the front of the brain, called the orbitofrontal cortex, plays a central role and studies have shown that patients with damage to this area confuse memories with reality and continue to anticipate events that are no longer likely to happen.

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The brain's ability to react adaptively, becomes crucial for survival, when faced with potential dangers, such as snakes and spiders, so to what extent does the harmfulness of an anticipated outcome affect our brain's event monitoring system? Not at all, reveals a new study published in the February 2011 issue of Elsevier's Cortex: the processes are the same, regardless how scary the anticipated event.

The team of researchers, supervised by Prof. Armin Schnider of the University Hospitals of Geneva in Switzerland, recorded functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) while healthy volunteers performed a task in which they repeatedly saw a pair of faces and had to predict on which face a target was about to appear. The target could be a simple black disk (neutral stimulus) or a spider (potentially harmful stimulus). The researchers found a strong activation of the brain's visual areas whenever the spider appeared. However, irrespective of whether the disk or the spider was the target, its unexpected absence activated a cerebral network including the orbitofrontal cortex.

The findings show that, while the potential harmfulness of an event strongly affects brain responses, it does not influence the way the brain reacts when the expected event does not occur. The study supports the notion that the orbitofrontal cortex is "at the centre of a specific cerebral network which functions as a generic outcome monitoring system," says Louis Nahum, the first author of the study. "This capacity is probably as old in evolution as the instinctive reaction to threatening stimuli; its failure deprives the brain of the ability to remain in phase with reality," notes Armin Schnider.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Elsevier. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Louis Nahum, Stιphane R. Simon, David Sander, Franηois Lazeyras, Armin Schnider. Neural response to the behaviorally relevant absence of anticipated outcomes and the presentation of potentially harmful stimuli: A human fMRI study. Cortex, 2011; 47 (2): 191 DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2009.11.007

Cite This Page:

Elsevier. "Snakes and spiders: Revealing the wiring that allows us to adapt to the unexpected." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 January 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110131092332.htm>.
Elsevier. (2011, January 31). Snakes and spiders: Revealing the wiring that allows us to adapt to the unexpected. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110131092332.htm
Elsevier. "Snakes and spiders: Revealing the wiring that allows us to adapt to the unexpected." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110131092332.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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