Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Key to understanding cause of lupus

Date:
February 2, 2011
Source:
Virginia Tech
Summary:
Potentially impacting future diagnosis and treatment of lupus, an immune illness affecting more than five million people worldwide, researchers have likely uncovered where the breakdown in the body's lymphocyte molecular regulatory machinery is occurring.

Potentially impacting future diagnosis and treatment of lupus, an immune illness affecting more than 5 million people worldwide, researchers at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech have likely uncovered where the breakdown in the body's lymphocyte molecular regulatory machinery is occurring.

Related Articles


Rujuan Dai, research scientist, and her colleagues in the veterinary college's Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, have discovered a "common set of dysregulated miRNAs in murine lupus models." The research, which appears in the Dec. 13, 2010, issue of the scientific journal PLoS One, was funded in part by the Lupus Foundation of America.

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease of connective tissue that causes the body's immune system to become hyperactive and attack normal, healthy tissue. This results in symptoms such as inflammation, swelling, and possible damage to joints, skin, kidneys, blood, the heart, or lungs.

In an effort to better understand epigenetic factors in the causes of lupus, researchers at the veterinary college focused on microRNA (miRNA), seeking to determine potential impairments of genetic regulation. These small RNAs control gene expression by directly regulating specific target messenger RNAs via inhibition of their translation or inducing their degradation.

"Micro RNAs perform these duties in an orderly fashion," said S. Ansar Ahmed, professor of immunology and head of the Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology at the college. "White blood cells use miRNA to regulate antibodies and other proteins in response to infection or any kind of assault."

The researchers chose three strains of autoimmune-prone mice that have different background genomes and manifest lupus-like disease at different ages. For example, one mouse strain began developing lupus-like disease around 3 months of age, and another mouse strain developed severe lupus much later, at 9 months of age.

Findings show that all three lupus strains manifest a common dysregulated pattern of miRNAs despite differences in their background genes. Importantly, this expression of miRNAs became evident only at an age when the mice manifest lupus.

The identification of these common miRNAs presents a new way of understanding lupus development. The researchers at the veterinary college believe these studies will potentially open a new approach for diagnosis and treatment of the illness by altering lupus-specific miRNAs in lymphocytes.

"In the short term, we want to use our better understanding of the disease to develop a tool in the form of molecular markers for early, reliable diagnosis," said Ahmed. The long-term goal, Ahmed added, is to offer entirely new therapeutic approaches, such as manipulation of lupus-related miRNA, to correct pathological conditions.

Having identified signature miRNA changes in lupus disease, the next step for the researchers is to prove they can really switch off the disease.

"If we can do this in a mouse model and then to cure other animals, hopefully it can one day be done in humans. This is long-range research but modern technology is narrowing the time it takes from mouse to human -- speeding translation," said Ahmed.

Co-authors on the article are Yan Zhang of the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute (VBI) at Virginia Tech; Deena Khan, biomedicine and veterinary science Ph.D. candidate; Bettina Heid, laboratory specialist with the college; David Caudell, assistant professor of biomedical science; and Oswald Crasta of VBI. 

Ahmed and Dai previously published work in the journal Blood, which led them to look at possible changes in expression of microRNAs in autoimmune lupus. They have also been invited to write a review article for a special issue of Translational Research that is devoted to the topic of microRNAs.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Virginia Tech. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rujuan Dai, Yan Zhang, Deena Khan, Bettina Heid, David Caudell, Oswald Crasta, S. Ansar Ahmed. Identification of a Common Lupus Disease-Associated microRNA Expression Pattern in Three Different Murine Models of Lupus. PLoS ONE, 2010; 5 (12): e14302 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0014302

Cite This Page:

Virginia Tech. "Key to understanding cause of lupus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110201083351.htm>.
Virginia Tech. (2011, February 2). Key to understanding cause of lupus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110201083351.htm
Virginia Tech. "Key to understanding cause of lupus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110201083351.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

Newsy (Nov. 28, 2014) — WHO cites four studies that say Ebola can still be detected in semen up to 82 days after the onset of symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins