Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Psychology students aim for cheap textbook alternatives

Date:
February 14, 2011
Source:
University of Cincinnati
Summary:
Students have researched a statewide Ohio initiative aimed at reducing textbook costs for college students. They found that a free e-textbook and lower-cost print materials all provided similar learning support as conventional textbooks. They suggested that a combination of digital and print materials were most supportive of student learning.

A group of University of Cincinnati seniors in the psychology program will nationally present their comparison of educational technology alternatives to purchasing college textbooks that can run into hundreds of dollars per academic quarter. Their research as part of the statewide Ohio Digital Bookshelf Project will be presented on Feb. 14, at the national EDUCAUSE Annual Meeting in Washington, DC.

The Digital Bookshelf Project is an initiative under the University System of Ohio (USO) Strategic Plan for Higher Education to develop a high-quality, affordable, flexible system of higher education with a wide range of educational options. The Digital Bookshelf Project is exploring educational textbook alternatives including e-texts and other technology alternatives aimed at reducing student costs.

The 11 UC students who took part in the research project compared the value and educational quality of a current $168 freshman textbook with the draft of a new textbook that they could get free on the Web, along with what they could find through online search engines. The students -- all senior members of UC's chapter of the Psi Chi international honor society of psychology students -- conducted their research last autumn.

"For our generation raised on the Internet, online searches for class materials often replace purchasing the textbook," explains presenter Libby Cates, one of the student researchers and president of the UC Psi Chi chapter. "So, our primary research question was: Can students depend on what they find when they Google key terms? Secondly, we wanted to see what benefits are delivered through textbooks in their various forms."

Under the guidance of Ohio Digital Bookshelf Project researcher Charles Ginn, associate professor of psychology, the students reported, "The materials found on Wikipedia were accurate and thorough, perhaps excessively thorough for an introductory course. These summaries were equal to or exceeded those found in the two textbooks."

Students also found that the free e-textbook and lower-cost print materials all provided similar learning support. They suggested that a combination of digital and print materials were most supportive of student learning.

Ginn and Digital Bookshelf Project leader Stephen Acker, research director of OhioLINK's eText Project, will also take part in the student project presentation in Washington, D.C. The UC Psi Chi student researchers presented their research on the state level before the Ohio Board of Regents last month.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cincinnati. The original article was written by Dawn Fuller. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Cincinnati. "Psychology students aim for cheap textbook alternatives." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110214155453.htm>.
University of Cincinnati. (2011, February 14). Psychology students aim for cheap textbook alternatives. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110214155453.htm
University of Cincinnati. "Psychology students aim for cheap textbook alternatives." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110214155453.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Science & Society News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) Inspired by the way a chameleon changes its colour to disguise itself; scientists in Poland want to replace traditional camouflage paint with thousands of electrochromic plates that will continuously change colour to blend with its surroundings. The first PL-01 concept tank prototype will be tested within a few years, with scientists predicting that a similar technology could even be woven into the fabric of a soldiers' clothing making them virtually invisible to the naked eye. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) Strong jet demand has pushed Boeing to raise its profit forecast for the third time, but analysts were disappointed by its small cash flow. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) Now that the U.S. is restricting travel from West Africa, some are dropping questions about a travel ban and instead asking about visa bans. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
US to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

US to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) Stepping up their vigilance against Ebola, federal authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the US from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins