Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Struggling to follow doctor's orders: Paid caregivers may lack the skills to take on health-related tasks in senior's homes

Date:
February 22, 2011
Source:
Northwestern University
Summary:
Paid caregivers make it possible for seniors to remain living in their homes, but a new study found that more than one-third of caregivers had difficulty reading and understanding health-related information and directions. Sixty percent made errors when sorting medications into pillboxes.

Paid caregivers make it possible for seniors to remain living in their homes. The problem, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study, is that more than one-third of caregivers had difficulty reading and understanding health-related information and directions. Sixty percent made errors when sorting medications into pillboxes.

The study will be published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

In a first-of-its-kind study, nearly 100 paid, non-family caregivers were recruited in the Chicago area and their health literacy levels and the health-related responsibilities were assessed, said Lee Lindquist, M.D., assistant professor of geriatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and physician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

"We found that nearly 86 percent of the caregivers perform health-related tasks," said Lindquist, lead author of the study. "Most of the caregivers are women, about 50 years old. Many are foreign born or have a limited education. The jobs typically pay just under $9.00 per hour, but nearly one-third of the caregivers earn less than minimum wage."

Lindquist found that despite pay, country of birth or education level, 60 percent of all the caregivers made errors when doling medication into a pillbox. This is an alarming statistic, because patients who don't take certain medications as prescribed could end up in the hospital, Lindquist said.

"Many of these caregivers are good people who don't want to disappoint and don't want to lose their jobs," Lindquist said. "So they take on health-related responsibilities, such as giving out medications and accompanying clients to the doctor for appointments. Most physicians and family members do not realize that while the caregiver is nodding and saying 'yes', she might not really understand what is being said."

Right now there isn't a standard test family members or employment agencies can use to gauge a caregiver's ability to understand and follow health-related information, Lindquist said.

"Currently we are developing tests consumers can use to evaluate caregiver skills as well as studying the screening processes caregiver agencies use," Lindquist said. "But, if you really want to know if the caregiver is doing a good job and is taking care of the health needs of your senior, start by going into the home, observing them doing the tasks, and asking more questions."

The Barney Family Foundation funded this study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Northwestern University. The original article was written by Erin White. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lee A. Lindquist, Nelia Jain, Karen Tam, Gary J. Martin, David W. Baker. Inadequate Health Literacy Among Paid Caregivers of Seniors. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2010; DOI: 10.1007/s11606-010-1596-2

Cite This Page:

Northwestern University. "Struggling to follow doctor's orders: Paid caregivers may lack the skills to take on health-related tasks in senior's homes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110222171238.htm>.
Northwestern University. (2011, February 22). Struggling to follow doctor's orders: Paid caregivers may lack the skills to take on health-related tasks in senior's homes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110222171238.htm
Northwestern University. "Struggling to follow doctor's orders: Paid caregivers may lack the skills to take on health-related tasks in senior's homes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110222171238.htm (accessed August 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, August 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) Here are three things you need to know about the deadly Ebola outbreak's progression this week. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins