Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Today's children do engage in active play: UK study

Date:
March 17, 2011
Source:
University of Bristol
Summary:
New research from the UK suggests that promoting active play in children's leisure time could increase the physical activity of today's children, but that such strategies might need to be tailored according to gender.

New research suggests that promoting active play in children's leisure time could increase the physical activity of today's children, but that such strategies might need to be tailored according to gender.

Related Articles


The paper, by Rowan Brockman and colleagues in the Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences within the School for Policy Studies at the University of Bristol, is published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

The researchers found children's perceptions of what constituted play were broad and included both physically active and sedentary behaviours. Children aged 10- to 11-years old reported that they frequently engaged in active play consistent with that of previous generations, and valued both the physical and social benefits it provided.

However, whereas boys prefer 'having a kick about' or riding bikes, girls are less likely to have an equivalent specific physical activity. Additionally, boys appear to have greater freedom to roam in their active play than girls. Finally, boys are more likely to play with neighbourhood friends but girls are more often restricted to playing with family members.

Rowan Brockman, a researcher in the Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, said: "Contemporary children do engage in active play and value both the physical and social benefits it provides. This suggests that some children, at least, do not prefer to spend all their time watching TV or on computer.

"However, further research is needed to build a more informed picture of children's play before we consider strategies to increase it."

Eleven focus groups were conducted with 77, 10- to 11-year-old children from four primary schools in Bristol. Focus groups examined: 1) children's perceptions of 'play'; 2) how much of their play is active play; and 3) contexts of children's active play.

Preventing the decline in physical activity, which occurs around 10- to 11-years of age, is a public health priority. Physically active play can make unique contributions to children's development that cannot be obtained from more structured forms of physical activity.

The study is part of a larger project, the Active Play Project (TAPP), which examines the contribution of active play to the overall physical activity of primary school children.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bristol. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rowan Brockman, Kenneth R Fox, Russell Jago. What is the meaning and nature of active play for today's children in the UK? International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2011; 8 (1): 15 DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-8-15

Cite This Page:

University of Bristol. "Today's children do engage in active play: UK study." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110317093106.htm>.
University of Bristol. (2011, March 17). Today's children do engage in active play: UK study. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110317093106.htm
University of Bristol. "Today's children do engage in active play: UK study." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110317093106.htm (accessed October 26, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

AFP (Oct. 25, 2014) — An American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Newsy (Oct. 25, 2014) — A Harvard University Research Team created genetically engineered stem cells that are able to kill cancer cells, while leaving other cells unharmed. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins