Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Free phone app helped doctors perform better in simulated cardiac emergency

Date:
March 29, 2011
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
Doctors who used a free iPhone application provided by the UK Resuscitation Council performed significantly better in a simulated medical emergency than those who did not. 31 doctors were recruited to take part in the study at the Royal United Hospital, Bath, UK. The ones that used the iResus application scored an average of 84 out of 100 on a specialist scale, which was significantly higher than the 72 average achieved in the control group.

Doctors who used a free iPhone application provided by the UK Resuscitation Council performed significantly better in a simulated medical emergency than those who did not, according to a study in the April issue of Anaesthesia.

"Every year approximately 30,000 people in the UK have an unexpected cardiac arrest in hospital and, despite significant advances in resuscitation research, survival rates for adults suffering a cardiac arrest remain poor" says Dr Daniel Low, the consultant anaesthetist who developed the application.

"More than 60,000 free copies of the iResus © application have already been downloaded and a healthcare professional recently told us that they had used it when they were involved in an out-of-hospital paediatric emergency. Being able to refer to paediatric drug doses they were unfamiliar with helped them to save a child's life."

Thirty-one doctors who had received advanced life-support training in the last four years were recruited to take part in the study at the Royal United Hospital, Bath, UK. The aim of the research was to see if the free iResus © application, which uses adult and paediatric algorithms and provides appropriate and user-friendly prompts, produced better results in a simulated medical emergency than relying purely on memory.

The doctors were divided into two groups, one armed with the iResus © application and the other without. They were then put through a simulated cardiac arrest emergency, assisted by a nurse, and their knowledge and skills were evaluated using the CASTest scoring system.

Doctors who used the iResus © application scored an average of 84.5 (range: 75.5 to 92.5) out of 100, which was significantly higher than the 72 average (range: 62 to 87) achieved in the control group.

All of the doctors who took part in the study were given the opportunity to try out the application and the general consensus was very positive.

"The doctors in our study found the application easy to use, felt that it would provide them with increased confidence in a stressful scenario and said that they would be happy to use it in a real clinical emergency" says Dr Low, who trained in the UK and recently moved to Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington, Washington State, USA. "When we asked them to mark those three benefits out of ten, the median scores were 8.0, 7.5 and 7.5 respectively.

"They did not feel that using the iResus © application was unprofessional or reflected a poor level of training in a real clinical situation. The application provides almost instant access to the appropriate algorithms and drug doses for resuscitation. This is important because research has demonstrated that when doctors are stressed they are more likely to make dosing errors."

The doctors had an average age of 27.5 years and had received their medical degree, on average, just under four years before they took part in the study. They came from a range of medical specialities, including anaesthesia, general medicine, paediatrics, emergency medicine, intensive care and surgery. The third who already owned iPhones were split equally between the two groups.

"Our study provides further support for the current evidence that CPR prompt devices improve skills and can lead to a better outcome when a patient suffers a cardiac arrest" concludes Dr Low.

"Although our research covered doctors who had qualified in the last four years, we feel that the iResus © application is just as useful for more experienced medical professionals, as operating in a high-stress environment can lead to sub-optimal performance in anyone.

"We believe that this simple application, which can be downloaded free, provides valuable additional support for all doctors faced with a life-saving emergency."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. D. Low, N. Clark, J. Soar, A. Padkin, A. Stoneham, G. D. Perkins, J. Nolan. A randomised control trial to determine if use of the iResus©application on a smart phone improves the performance of an advanced life support provider in a simulated medical emergency*. Anaesthesia, 2011; 66 (4): 255 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2044.2011.06649.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Free phone app helped doctors perform better in simulated cardiac emergency." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110329095650.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2011, March 29). Free phone app helped doctors perform better in simulated cardiac emergency. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110329095650.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Free phone app helped doctors perform better in simulated cardiac emergency." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110329095650.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) — Nine-month-old Wyatt Scott was born with a rare disorder called congenital trismus, which prevents him from opening his mouth. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) — The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins