Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Targeting way to stop brain tumor cell invasion

Date:
March 29, 2011
Source:
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Summary:
Researchers have found the mechanisms used by malignant glioma cells to travel through the brain, and may have found a way to interfere in that process.

Gliomas are brain invaders. A kind of malignant tumor cell, gliomas branch out like tendrils from a central tumor source, spreading cancer throughout the brain. Traditional therapies, such as cutting out the tumor surgically, can be ineffective if the cells have already spread. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham may have come upon a way to stop a glioma invasion in its tracks, using a drug already approved for use in Europe.

Much like early explorers of the Old West followed rivers and streams, depending on them to provide drinking water and food, gliomas spread through the brain by following the path of blood vessels, tapping into those vessels for the nutrients they need to survive. Cut that glioma off from the blood supply, and it starves.

"An explorer lost in the wilderness without food and water soon succumbs and dies," said Harald Sontheimer, Ph.D., director of the UAB Center for Glial Biology in Medicine and senior author on the paper. "A glioma that can't find and tap into a blood vessel will also die."

In a paper published March 30, 2011 in the Journal of Neuroscience, Sontheimer and co-author Vedrana Montana, Ph.D., discovered that bradykinin, a peptide that increases the size of blood vessels, is the mechanism glioma cells use to find blood vessels. Glioma cells carry a receptor for bradykinin, called the B2R receptor. Using that receptor to attract bradykinin gives the cell a navigator to lead it to blood vessels. Block the receptor from interacting with bradykinin and the cell will end up lost in the wilderness.

The researchers introduced a B2R inhibitor known as HOE 140, a laboratory version of a drug approved for use in Europe for hereditary angioedema called Icatibant. HOE 140 bound to the B2R receptor on glioma cells, interfering with the receptor's opportunity to bind to bradykinin. The results were impressive.

"We found that 77 percent of glioma cells with bradykinin were able to locate a blood vessel and tap into its nutrients," said Montana. "However, when we blocked the B2R receptors from interacting with bradykinin, only 19 percent of glioma cells were able to find a blood vessel."

The researchers used human glioma cells transplanted into a mouse model and, using time-lapse techniques on a laser-scanning microscope, tracked the ability of the cells to navigate to blood vessels by means of fluorescent markers attached to the cells.

"Targeting the B2R receptors is an elegant and so far unexplored approach to treat gliomas, one of the most devastating types of brain tumor," said Sontheimer. "Icatibant, which is already in use in Europe, and its ability to block B2R receptors may prove to be very promising target for further investigation."

The American Brain Tumor Association provided funding for this research through a post-doctoral fellowship awared to Montana.

About 18,000 Americans develop gliomas each year and about half will die within 12 months of diagnosis, according to the Society for Neuroscience.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alabama at Birmingham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Targeting way to stop brain tumor cell invasion." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110329172249.htm>.
University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2011, March 29). Targeting way to stop brain tumor cell invasion. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110329172249.htm
University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Targeting way to stop brain tumor cell invasion." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110329172249.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins