Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Reliance on medical journals, deadlines can predict journalists' attitudes toward press releases

Date:
April 6, 2011
Source:
University of Missouri-Columbia
Summary:
A researcher surveyed more than 300 health journalists and found that those who cover strokes and stroke prevention tend to hold negative views of corporate pharmacy media relations, while those who regularly read medical journals tend to cover more stories based on corporate press releases.

Public relations professionals constantly look for ways to most effectively promote their messages to the media. Sun-A Park, a researcher at the University of Missouri School of Journalism surveyed more than 300 health journalists and found that those who cover strokes and stroke prevention tend to hold negative views of corporate pharmacy media relations, while those who regularly read medical journals tend to cover more stories based on corporate press releases.

Park says one key factor influencing journalists' attitudes concerning corporate media press releases is the specific health topics they cover.

"Not many public relations campaigns are devoted to stroke and stroke prevention, which would help explain the low public recognition of strokes," Park said. "So health journalists who write about strokes are not accustomed to receiving public relations materials and thus are uncomfortable with the topic."

Park also found that the more frequently health journalists read other newspapers and medical journals, the more open they are to covering stories based on press releases. Park says if journalists already depend on other media sources to help decide what is newsworthy, this habit could extend to public relations press releases as well. She also thinks deadline pressure can play a role.

"Journalists are often under deadline pressure; and if they routinely read medical journals for story ideas, they develop a willingness to use sources that help simplify complex and difficult health topics for a broad audience," Park said. "Thus, health journalists who read medical journals are more receptive to using corporate pharmacy press releases in order to meet deadlines and help general news audiences to better understand the information."

Park's study also revealed that health journalists who serve a metropolitan audience rather than those who serve national or small community audiences, are more likely to have positive attitudes toward corporate pharmacy media relations. Park recommends that corporate pharmacy public relations professionals target these specific journalists with their press releases in order to be most efficient and effective with their efforts.

This study was conducted by the Health Communication Research Center in the University of Missouri School of Journalism. It was published in PRism, a public relations journal.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Missouri-Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Missouri-Columbia. "Reliance on medical journals, deadlines can predict journalists' attitudes toward press releases." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110406142345.htm>.
University of Missouri-Columbia. (2011, April 6). Reliance on medical journals, deadlines can predict journalists' attitudes toward press releases. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110406142345.htm
University of Missouri-Columbia. "Reliance on medical journals, deadlines can predict journalists' attitudes toward press releases." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110406142345.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A research institute in Paris somehow misplaced more than 2,000 vials of the deadly SARS virus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Formerly Conjoined Twins Released From Dallas Hospital

Formerly Conjoined Twins Released From Dallas Hospital

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) Conjoined twins Emmett and Owen Ezell were separated by doctors in August. Now, nearly nine months later, they're being released from the hospital. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) The ebola virus outbreak in West Africa is now linked to 121 deaths. Health officials fear the virus will continue to spread in urban areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins