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Toward new medications for chronic brain diseases

Date:
April 22, 2011
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
A needle-in-the-haystack search through nearly 390,000 chemical compounds had led scientists to a substance that can sneak through the protective barrier surrounding the brain with effects promising for new drugs for Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. The substance blocks the formation of cholesterol in the brain.

A needle-in-the-haystack search through nearly 390,000 chemical compounds had led scientists to a substance that can sneak through the protective barrier surrounding the brain with effects promising for new drugs for Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. They report on the substance, which blocks formation of cholesterol in the brain, in the journal, ACS Chemical Biology.

Aleksey G. Kazantsev and colleagues previously discovered that blocking cholesterol formation in the brain could protect against some of the damage caused by chronic brain disorders like Parkinson's disease. Several other studies have suggested that too much cholesterol may kill brain cells in similar neurodegenerative diseases. So they launched a search for a so-called "small molecules" -- substances ideal for developing into medicines -- capable of blocking formation of cholesterol.

They describe discovery of a small molecule that blocks the activity of a key protein involved in cholesterol production. It successfully lowered cholesterol levels in isolated nerve cells and brain slices from mice. If the molecule proves to be a good target for developing new drugs, the scientists note, "it could have a broader application in other neurological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease, for which modulation of cholesterol and other associated metabolic pathways might be of therapeutic benefit."

The authors acknowledge funding from the Carmen Foundation, the RJG Foundation, the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, the CHDI Foundation, the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, and the Swiss National Science Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. David M. Taylor, Uma Balabadra, Zhongmin Xiang, Ben Woodman, Sarah Meade, Allison Amore, Michele M. Maxwell, Steven Reeves, Gillian P. Bates, Ruth Luthi-Carter, Philip A. S. Lowden, Aleksey G. Kazantsev. A Brain-Permeable Small Molecule Reduces Neuronal Cholesterol by Inhibiting Activity of Sirtuin 2 Deacetylase. ACS Chemical Biology, 2011; 110309084925086 DOI: 10.1021/cb100376q

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Toward new medications for chronic brain diseases." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110420112106.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2011, April 22). Toward new medications for chronic brain diseases. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110420112106.htm
American Chemical Society. "Toward new medications for chronic brain diseases." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110420112106.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

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