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Study says eliminate pelvic imaging to reduce radiation for the detection of venous thromboembolism

Date:
May 3, 2011
Source:
American Roentgen Ray Society
Summary:
A recent study shows that pelvic imaging using computed tomography examinations are not necessary for diagnosing patients with venous thromboembolism and eliminating this exam can significantly reduce a patient's exposure to excessive radiation dose.

A recent study shows that pelvic imaging using computed tomography (CT) examinations are not necessary for diagnosing patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) and eliminating this exam can significantly reduce a patient's exposure to excessive radiation dose.

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CT venography of the pelvis during CT pulmonary angiography does not improve the detection of VTE, says Dr. Charbel Ishak, lead author for this study. He asserts, "Using CT venography in the lower extremities without including the pelvis can decrease the population's radiation dose generated by CT usage."

In a retrospective review of 1,527 patients at the Nassau University Medical Center during a three-year period, only 0.3% (5 of 1,527) of patients presented with isolated pelvic VTE after pulmonary embolism was ruled out of the CT protocol.

Dr. Ishak believes that these results are promising for helping radiologists implement new protocols for pelvic examination and reducing further radiation in patients. He says, "Radiologists and technologists can eliminate pelvic imaging while acquiring only images of the lower extremities with CT venography, starting from groin to below the knee. We believe that by stopping the imaging of the pelvis, we can decrease patient radiation dose without significantly affecting the diagnosis of VTE."

Dr. Ishak is delivering a presentation on this study May 3, 2011 at the 2011 ARRS Annual Meeting at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Roentgen Ray Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Roentgen Ray Society. "Study says eliminate pelvic imaging to reduce radiation for the detection of venous thromboembolism." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110503081001.htm>.
American Roentgen Ray Society. (2011, May 3). Study says eliminate pelvic imaging to reduce radiation for the detection of venous thromboembolism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110503081001.htm
American Roentgen Ray Society. "Study says eliminate pelvic imaging to reduce radiation for the detection of venous thromboembolism." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110503081001.htm (accessed April 21, 2015).

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