Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study says eliminate pelvic imaging to reduce radiation for the detection of venous thromboembolism

Date:
May 3, 2011
Source:
American Roentgen Ray Society
Summary:
A recent study shows that pelvic imaging using computed tomography examinations are not necessary for diagnosing patients with venous thromboembolism and eliminating this exam can significantly reduce a patient's exposure to excessive radiation dose.

A recent study shows that pelvic imaging using computed tomography (CT) examinations are not necessary for diagnosing patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) and eliminating this exam can significantly reduce a patient's exposure to excessive radiation dose.

CT venography of the pelvis during CT pulmonary angiography does not improve the detection of VTE, says Dr. Charbel Ishak, lead author for this study. He asserts, "Using CT venography in the lower extremities without including the pelvis can decrease the population's radiation dose generated by CT usage."

In a retrospective review of 1,527 patients at the Nassau University Medical Center during a three-year period, only 0.3% (5 of 1,527) of patients presented with isolated pelvic VTE after pulmonary embolism was ruled out of the CT protocol.

Dr. Ishak believes that these results are promising for helping radiologists implement new protocols for pelvic examination and reducing further radiation in patients. He says, "Radiologists and technologists can eliminate pelvic imaging while acquiring only images of the lower extremities with CT venography, starting from groin to below the knee. We believe that by stopping the imaging of the pelvis, we can decrease patient radiation dose without significantly affecting the diagnosis of VTE."

Dr. Ishak is delivering a presentation on this study May 3, 2011 at the 2011 ARRS Annual Meeting at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Roentgen Ray Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Roentgen Ray Society. "Study says eliminate pelvic imaging to reduce radiation for the detection of venous thromboembolism." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110503081001.htm>.
American Roentgen Ray Society. (2011, May 3). Study says eliminate pelvic imaging to reduce radiation for the detection of venous thromboembolism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 15, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110503081001.htm
American Roentgen Ray Society. "Study says eliminate pelvic imaging to reduce radiation for the detection of venous thromboembolism." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110503081001.htm (accessed September 15, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 15, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

EU Ministers and Experts Meet to Discuss Ebola Reponse

EU Ministers and Experts Meet to Discuss Ebola Reponse

AFP (Sep. 15, 2014) The European Commission met on Monday to coordinate aid that the EU can offer to African countries affected by the Ebola outbreak. Duration: 00:58 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

AP (Sep. 15, 2014) The FDA is considering whether to ban devices used by the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Massachusetts, the only place in the country known to use electrical skin shocks as aversive conditioning for aggressive patients. (Sept. 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Newsy (Sep. 14, 2014) The respiratory virus Enterovirus D68, which targets children, has spread from the Midwest to 21 states. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins