Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New treatment dissolves blood clots in brain tissue

Date:
May 28, 2011
Source:
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Summary:
A new treatment that treats a subset of stroke patients by combining minimally invasive surgery, an imaging technique likened to "GPS for the brain," and the clot-busting drug t-PA appears to be safe and effective, according to new research.

A new treatment that treats a subset of stroke patients by combining minimally invasive surgery, an imaging technique likened to "GPS for the brain," and the clot-busting drug t-PA appears to be safe and effective, according to a multicenter clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins researchers.

Related Articles


The novel treatment, detailed for the first time at this week's European Stroke Conference in Hamburg, Germany, was developed for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), a bleed in the brain that causes a clot to form within brain tissue. This clot builds up pressure and leaches inflammatory chemicals that can cause irreversible brain damage, often leading to death or extreme disability. The usual treatments for ICH -- either general supportive care such as blood pressure control and ventilation, which is considered the current standard of care, or invasive surgeries that involve taking off portions of the skull to remove the clot -- have similar mortality rates, ranging from 30 to 80 percent depending on the size of the clot.

Seeking to improve these mortality rates and surviving ICH patients' quality of life, Daniel Hanley, M.D., professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and his colleagues developed and tested the new treatment on 60 patients at 12 hospitals in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and Germany. They compared their results to those of 11 patients who received only supportive care.

After neurologists diagnosed patients in the treatment group with ICH at these hospitals, surgeons drilled dime-sized holes in patients' skulls close to the clot location. Using high-tech neuro-navigational software that provides detailed brain images, the physicians threaded catheters through the holes and directly into the clots. They used these catheters to drip t-PA into the clot for up to three days at one of two doses, either 0.3 mg or 1 mg, every eight hours.

The researchers found that clot size in patients treated with either dose shrunk by more than half, compared to only 1 percent in patients who received only supportive care. Comparison of daily CT scans showed that patients in the treatment group whose catheters were most accurately placed through the longest part of the clot had the most effective clot size reduction.

Those in the treatment group and the supportive care group had about a 10 percent mortality rate at 30 days after treatment, lower than the typically high mortality rates expected for this condition. After following the patients out for six months, the researchers found that the treated patients scored significantly higher on a test that measures the ability to function in daily life compared to those who received supportive care.

Overall, Hanley says, the new treatment appears to be a viable and promising alternative to the current standard treatments of supportive care or invasive surgery.

"We're confirming that patients do recover better if we remove as much of the clot as we can, but gentle removal appears to be key," he says. "Reducing the clot's size with a minimally invasive method seems to be pivotal for optimizing patient recovery."

Hanley and his colleagues plan to continue investigating the treatment in a larger multicenter trial.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "New treatment dissolves blood clots in brain tissue." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110527123421.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. (2011, May 28). New treatment dissolves blood clots in brain tissue. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110527123421.htm
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "New treatment dissolves blood clots in brain tissue." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110527123421.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

AP (Nov. 21, 2014) Marine Corps officials say a special operations officer left paralyzed by a sniper's bullet in Afghanistan walked using robotic leg braces in a ceremony to award him a Bronze Star. (Nov. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins