Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Inpatient hospitalization rates appear to have increased among children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders, but decreased among elderly

Date:
August 1, 2011
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Over a 10-year period, rates of short-stay inpatient hospitalizations increased for children and adolescents but decreased for elderly who had a primary psychiatric diagnosis, according to new study. The article also finds the proportion of inpatient days paid for by private health insurance appeared to decline among children, adolescents and adults.

Over a 10-year period, rates of short-stay inpatient hospitalizations increased for children and adolescents but decreased for elderly who had a primary psychiatric diagnosis, according to a report published Online First today by Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The article also finds the proportion of inpatient days paid for by private health insurance appeared to decline among children, adolescents and adults.

Related Articles


According to background information in the article, inpatient care for psychiatric conditions in short-stay settings increased from 1970 through the 1990s as long-term psychiatric hospitalization decreased. Since then, payers have reduced expenditures in these acute care settings and mental health policy makers and advocates have emphasized treatment alternatives with less restrictiveness and less negative stigma. Between 1990 and 2000, admissions to U.S. inpatient psychiatric services declined, but various data have suggested an increase in more recent years.

Joseph C. Blader, Ph.D., from the Stony Brook University School of Medicine, State University of New York, Stony Brook, evaluated trends in acute care hospitalizations for primary psychiatric diagnoses between 1996 and 2007, segmented by patient-level variables. He used demographic, clinical and payment data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey on a probability sample of discharges from short-stay facilities. Patients included in the study had a primary psychiatric diagnosis and were classified as children (ages 5 to 13 years), adolescents (ages 14 to 19 years), adults (ages 20 to 64 years) or elderly individuals (ages 65 years and older). Payers were classified as private, government or other (self-pay, no charge and other payment).

The study found increases in discharges for children and adolescents, as well as more moderate increases for adults, while discharge rates for elderly patients declined. However, the total inpatient days increased from 1,845 days per 100,000 in 1996 to 4,370 days in 2007 for children and from 5,882 days per 100,000 in 1996 to 8,247 days in 2007 for adolescents; again, a decrease was seen among elderly individuals, from 10,348 days per 100,000 in 1996 to 6,517 in 2007. Also, during the years studied, the proportion of inpatient days covered by private payers decreased among children, adolescents, and adults. Through the period surveyed, primary diagnoses of bipolar disorder increased and primary diagnoses of anxiety decreased.

"In conclusion, a substantial increase in acute care psychiatric hospitalization rates and inpatient occupancy for children and adolescents, a moderate increase in the hospitalization rate of adults, and a steep decline for elderly individuals represent significant developments in mental health treatment in the United States with potentially strong ramifications for quality of care and service financing," writes Blader. "Investigation of the clinical and organizational determinants of these trends, and their impact on patient outcomes, are vital to understanding their implications."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joseph C. Blader. Acute Inpatient Care for Psychiatric Disorders in the United States, 1996 Through 2007. Archives of General Psychiatry, 2011; DOI: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.84

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Inpatient hospitalization rates appear to have increased among children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders, but decreased among elderly." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110801172729.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2011, August 1). Inpatient hospitalization rates appear to have increased among children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders, but decreased among elderly. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110801172729.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Inpatient hospitalization rates appear to have increased among children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders, but decreased among elderly." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110801172729.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, December 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) A double-amputee makes history by becoming the first person to wear and operate two prosthetic arms using only his mind. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins