Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Triple therapy regime puts patients with leukemic form of cutaneous lymphoma in remission

Date:
August 19, 2011
Source:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Summary:
A three-pronged immunotherapy approach nearly doubles five-year survival among patients with rare leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, reports a new study.

A three-pronged immunotherapy approach nearly doubles five-year survival among patients with rare leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, reports a new study by dermatologists from the Abramson Cancer Center and Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Related Articles


In a retrospective study of 98 patients with advanced Sezary Syndrome -- treated over a 25 year time span at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania -- patients treated with combination therapy experienced a higher overall response rate compared to previous studies (74.4 percent vs. 63 percent), and a higher complete response rate (30 percent vs. 20 percent). The 5-year overall survival rate was also higher than previously reported (55 percent vs. 30 percent). Researchers concluded that combination immunotherapy is more effective than a single treatment.

"This rare disease, if caught soon enough, may no longer be fatal, thanks to advances in treatment and our understanding of the disease," said Alain Rook, MD, professor of Dermatology and senior author of the study, which appears online in the Archives of Dermatology, a JAMA/Archives journal. "In addition, our improved understanding of prognostic factors will help us tailor treatments for each patient, based on the aggressiveness of their disease, and better predict individual patient outcomes."

Sezary Syndrome is difficult to treat and has had a poor prognosis. In patients with Sezary Syndrome, malignant T-cells proliferate in the blood, while skin on the surface becomes inflamed, scaly and extremely itchy and doesn't respond to typical skin treatments. The lymphoma circulates in the blood, and tumors spread to the lymph nodes and internal organs. Typically, in the past, as few as 30 percent of patients survived 5 years with Sezary Syndrome; on average, patients survived 40 months after diagnosis.

In the Penn study, patients with advanced Sezary Syndrome received multimodality immunotherapy composed of extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) and one or more systemic immunostimulatory agents such as interferon alpha, interferon gamma and/or retinoids.

Patients treated at earlier stages of the disease fared better. A complete response, defined as complete clearance of skin, blood and node involvement for at least 4 weeks, was seen in 30 percent of patients (n= 29). Partial response was found in 45 percent of patients (44). The 5-year survival rate for all groups was 55 percent, and was highest in subsets of patients with stage IIIB disease (80 percent), IVA1 (80 percent), IVA2 (76 percent). Overall median survival time was 65 months; for patients with stage IVA1, median survival was 12 years; stage IVA2, 7 years. For patients with stage IIIB, median survival could not yet be calculated because many patients are still living.

Researchers also identified biological factors to help predict how each patient would respond to treatment. They confirmed that patients with a higher circulating tumor burden had a poor response to treatment. Patients with a higher number of antigen-presenting cells had better outcomes, potentially because antigen-presenting cells process the tumor cells killed by ECP treatment.

Based on this research, the efficacy of combination immunotherapy and increased understanding of the disease response to treatments will significantly extend the lives of patients with Sezary Syndrome.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Brian A. Raphael; Daniel B. Shin; Karen R. Suchin; Kelly A. Morrissey; Carmela C. Vittorio; Ellen J. Kim; Jennifer M. Gardner; Katherine G. Evans; Camille E. Introcaso; Sara S. Samimi; Joel M. Gelfand; Alain H. Rook. High Clinical Response Rate of Sιzary Syndrome to Immunomodulatory Therapies: Prognostic Markers of Response. Archives of Dermatology, Aug 2011 DOI: 10.1001/archdermatol.2011.232

Cite This Page:

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "Triple therapy regime puts patients with leukemic form of cutaneous lymphoma in remission." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110815162335.htm>.
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. (2011, August 19). Triple therapy regime puts patients with leukemic form of cutaneous lymphoma in remission. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110815162335.htm
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "Triple therapy regime puts patients with leukemic form of cutaneous lymphoma in remission." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110815162335.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

AP (Dec. 18, 2014) — As part of a six-month investigation of child maltreatment deaths, the AP found that hundreds of deaths from horrific abuse and neglect could have been prevented. AP's Haven Daley reports. (Dec. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dads-To-Be Also Experience Hormone Changes During Pregnancy

Dads-To-Be Also Experience Hormone Changes During Pregnancy

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) — A study from University of Michigan researchers found that expectant fathers see a decrease in testosterone as the baby's birth draws near. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) — Harvard researchers found children whose mothers were exposed to high pollution levels in the third trimester were twice as likely to develop autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) — Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins