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Former football players prone to late-life health problems, study finds

Date:
November 9, 2011
Source:
University of Missouri-Columbia
Summary:
Football players experience repeated head trauma throughout their careers, which results in short and long-term effects to their cognitive function, physical and mental health. Researchers are investigating how other lifestyle factors, including diet and exercise, impact the late-life health of former collision-sport athletes.

Former football players experience more late-life cognitive difficulties and worse health than other former athletes and non-athletes. An MU study found that these athletes can alter their diet and exercise habits to improve their mental and physical health.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Missouri-Columbia

Football players experience repeated head trauma throughout their careers, which results in short and long-term effects to their cognitive function, physical and mental health. University of Missouri researchers are investigating how other lifestyle factors, including diet and exercise, impact the late-life health of former collision-sport athletes.

The researchers found that former football players experience more late-life cognitive difficulties and worse physical and mental health than other former athletes and non-athletes. In addition, former football players who consumed high-fat diets had greater cognitive difficulties with recalling information, orientation and engaging and applying ideas. Frequent, vigorous exercise was associated with higher physical and mental health ratings.

"While the negative effects of repeated collisions can't be completely reversed, this study suggests that former athletes can alter their lifestyle behaviors to change the progression of cognitive decline," said Pam Hinton, associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology. "Even years after they're done playing sports, athletes can improve their diet and exercise habits to improve their mental and physical health."

In the study, Hinton compared former collision sport (football) players to former non-collision- sport athletes and non-athletes. Participants were given questionnaires to assess their cognitive, mental and physical health. The researchers examined how players' current lifestyle habits negatively or positively affected their collision-related health problems. Former football players who consumed more total and saturated fat and cholesterol reported more cognitive difficulties than those who consumed less fat and had better dietary habits.

"Football will always be around, so it's impossible to eliminate head injuries; however, we can identify ways to reduce the detrimental health effects of repeated head trauma," Hinton said. "It's important to educate athletes and people who work with athletes about the benefits of low-fat and balanced diets to help players improve their health both while playing sports and later in life. It's a simple, but not an easy thing to do."

Hinton is the director of graduate studies for the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology in the College of Human Environmental Sciences (HES). The department is a joint effort by HES, the School of Medicine and the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

The study, "Effects of Current Exercise and Diet on Late-Life Cognitive Health of Former College Football Players," is published in the current issue of Physician and Sportsmedicine. In future studies, the researchers plan to increase the sample size and have participants perform tests to measure cognitive functioning instead of utilizing self-reported measures.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Missouri-Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Pamela Hinton, Brick Johnstone, Edward Blaine, Angela Bodling. Effects of Current Exercise and Diet on Late-Life Cognitive Health of Former College Football Players. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 2011; 39 (3): 11 DOI: 10.3810/psm.2011.09.1916

Cite This Page:

University of Missouri-Columbia. "Former football players prone to late-life health problems, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 November 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111109125747.htm>.
University of Missouri-Columbia. (2011, November 9). Former football players prone to late-life health problems, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111109125747.htm
University of Missouri-Columbia. "Former football players prone to late-life health problems, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111109125747.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

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