Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Every mouse is different: How mouse 'personality' sheds light on human depression

Date:
November 14, 2011
Source:
Elhuyar Fundazioa
Summary:
Just as in humans, there are also the tough types or those with a more delicate personality among mice, researchers confirm. Some adopt an active strategy when faced with stressful situations and somehow try to tackle the problem, whereas others display a passive attitude. Those in the second group are more vulnerable: some of the physiological characteristics resemble those attributed to human depression.

Just as in humans, there are also the tough types or those with a more delicate personality among mice.
Credit: © Phoebe / Fotolia

Just as in humans, there are also the tough types or those with a more delicate personality among mice, as Eneritz Gómez, a psychologist at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), has been able to confirm. Some adopt an active strategy when faced with stress situations and somehow try to tackle the problem, whereas others display a passive attitude. Those in the second group are more vulnerable: some of the physiological characteristics resemble those attributed to human depression.

These results have been defended in her thesis entitled Diferencias individuales en ratones derrotados crónicamente: cambios conductuales, neuroendocrinos, inmunitarios y neurotróficos como marcadores de vulnerabilidad a los efectos del estrés (Individual differences in chronically defeated mice: behavioural, neuroendocrine, immune and, neurotrophic changes as indicators of vulnerability to effects of stress.)

Specifically, Gómez has used defeat-induced chronic social stress as the basis for her study. "Mice are very territorial. Five males and one female tend to live together. Only one male mates with the female, the same one that gains control of all the resources right from the start," she explains. These males fight amongst themselves, and the same mouse always wins; that is why it takes possession of everything, while the rest suffer defeat-induced chronic social stress. However, not all the losing mice end up equally affected; some get so low that they become ill, while others do not. Setting out to clarify why these differences arise, she focused on how the mice react to stress.

Active vs. Passive

"Stress is related to psychological disorder, but not all the subjects develop this disorder. This happens because they have different ways of acting when faced with stress," explains Gómez. This is her conclusion after filming the performance of all types of mice, analysing it and classifying it in terms of a passive or active strategy. And how do the two strategies differ? For example, if the dominant mouse were to attack, the dominated passive would not even move, whereas the active one would flee.

"The passive ones remain still nearly all the time, and as the stress goes on, they become even stiller. The active one is also aware that the stress is very hard and that it cannot get out of it, but it puts up greater resistance," says Gómez. There is also a great difference with respect to how they interact with the group leader. In fact, the one that makes use of the active strategy is interested in what is going on around it, it sniffs the dominant one, and tries to interact with it… Whereas the one adopting the passive strategy does not even look at it. The researcher can see similarities with human attitudes in all this.

Apart from behaviour, Gómez has studied the physiological signs (neuroendocrine, immune, and neurochemical alterations) of these dominated mice, and has seen that in this case, too, it is possible to make a classification on the basis of the strategy chosen. And also to draw comparisons with human beings. Specifically, she has confirmed that the clinical state of the passive mouse is not far removed from that of human depression: some of the physiological alterations displayed by these mice have been previously linked to disorders associated with stress, like depression.

With all this, the researcher has found the answer to the question that "they all get stressed but not all of them fall ill." And the fact is, the passive strategy reflects greater vulnerability, so these mice are more likely to fall ill.

Practical implications

The thesis is a theoretical contribution but could well be useful in the practical field. For example, in the design of therapies that can help to alter status perception in cases like those of cancer patients. At the same time, the physiological study done by Gómez could provide clues in the area of pharmacology for treating depression: "If we can see what physiological mechanisms are involved, the treatments could be more specialised."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Elhuyar Fundazioa. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Elhuyar Fundazioa. "Every mouse is different: How mouse 'personality' sheds light on human depression." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 November 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111114093409.htm>.
Elhuyar Fundazioa. (2011, November 14). Every mouse is different: How mouse 'personality' sheds light on human depression. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111114093409.htm
Elhuyar Fundazioa. "Every mouse is different: How mouse 'personality' sheds light on human depression." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111114093409.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) — West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) — Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Asteroid's Timing Was 'Colossal Bad Luck' For The Dinosaurs

Asteroid's Timing Was 'Colossal Bad Luck' For The Dinosaurs

Newsy (July 28, 2014) — The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs struck at the worst time for them. A new study says that if it hit earlier or later, they might've survived. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge from Nest

Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge from Nest

AP (July 27, 2014) — A live-streaming webcam catches loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings emerging from a nest in the Florida Keys. (July 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins