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New disinfection technique could revolutionize hospital room cleaning

Date:
December 9, 2011
Source:
Queen's University
Summary:
A Queen's University infectious disease expert has collaborated in the development of a disinfection system that may change the way hospital rooms all over the world are cleaned as well as stop bed bug outbreaks in hotels and apartments.

Dick Zoutman holds a dish filled with bed bugs killed by a new disinfection technology he helped develop.
Credit: Image courtesy of Queen's University

A Queen's University infectious disease expert has collaborated in the development of a disinfection system that may change the way hospital rooms all over the world are cleaned as well as stop bed bug outbreaks in hotels and apartments.

"This is the future, because many hospital deaths are preventable with better cleaning methods," says Dick Zoutman, who is also Quinte Health Care's new Chief of Staff. "It has been reported that more than 100,000 people in North America die every year due to hospital acquired infections at a cost of $30 billion. That's 100,000 people every year who are dying from largely preventable infections."

Dr. Zoutman has also used this disinfection technology to kill bed bugs. A major U.S. hotel chain has already expressed interest in the technology because of its potential to save the company millions of dollars in lost revenue and infected furniture.

Dr. Zoutman worked in collaboration with Dr. Michael Shannon of Medizone International at laboratories located in Innovation Park, Queen's University. Medizone is commercializing the technology and the first deliveries are scheduled for the first quarter of 2012.

The new technology involves pumping a Medizone-specific ozone and hydrogen peroxide vapour gas mixture into a room to completely sterilize everything -- including floors, walls, drapes, mattresses, chairs and other surfaces. It is far more effective in killing bacteria than wiping down a room.

Dr. Zoutman says the technique is similar to what we now know Mother Nature uses to kill bacteria in humans. When an antibody attacks a germ, it generates ozone and a minute amount of hydrogen peroxide producing a new highly reactive compound that is profoundly lethal against bacteria, viruses and mold.

"It works well for Mother Nature and is working very well for us," says Dr. Zoutman.

There are other disinfecting technologies that involve pumping gas into a room, but Medizone's method is the only one that sterilizes as well as surgical instrument cleaning. It also leaves a pleasant smell and doesn't affect any medical equipment in the room. The entire disinfection process is also faster than other methods -- it takes less than one hour.

Dr. Zoutman says the technology could also be used in food preparation areas and processing plants after outbreaks such as listeria and to disinfect cruise ships after an infection outbreak.

Study results on the process are published in the December issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen's University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Dick Zoutman, Michael Shannon, Arkady Mandel. Effectiveness of a novel ozone-based system for the rapid high-level disinfection of health care spaces and surfaces. American Journal of Infection Control, 2011; 39 (10): 873 DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2011.01.012

Cite This Page:

Queen's University. "New disinfection technique could revolutionize hospital room cleaning." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 December 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/12/111209105703.htm>.
Queen's University. (2011, December 9). New disinfection technique could revolutionize hospital room cleaning. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/12/111209105703.htm
Queen's University. "New disinfection technique could revolutionize hospital room cleaning." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/12/111209105703.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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