Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Deer antlers inspire a new theory on osteoporosis

Date:
January 3, 2012
Source:
Plataforma SINC
Summary:
The loss of manganese could mean that calcium does not stick to bones and could cause osteoporosis. This is the new theory put forward after studying deer antlers. The hypothesis still needs to be confirmed by the scientific community.

Three broken antlers and an intact one. The weakening is due to manganese depletion.
Credit: IREC

The loss of manganese could mean that calcium does not stick to bones and could cause osteoporosis. This is the new theory put forward by researchers at the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM) in Spain after studying deer antlers. The hypothesis published this month in the Frontiers of Bioscience journal still needs to be confirmed by the scientific community.

Through the study of deer antlers, researchers of the Research Institute of Hunting Resources (IREC, joint centre UCLM-CSIC-JCCM) suggest that the origin of osteoporosis could not be directly linked to the lack of calcium but rather to the lack of a mineral essential to calcium absorption. In particular they believe that this could be manganese, according to a new theory published in the latest issue of the 'Frontiers of Bioscience' journal.

According to Tomαs Landete, sub-director of the IREC and one of team's researchers, "previous antler studies show that manganese is necessary for calcium absorption. Our hypothesis is that when the human body absorbs less manganese or when it is sent from the skeleton to other organs that require it, such as the brain, the calcium that is extracted at the same time is then not properly absorbed and is excreted in the urine. It is in this way that osteoporosis can slowly strike."

The theory must now be validated with more studies and medical trials but its creators believe that it is a "step in a totally new direction in osteoporosis research as it considers calcium loss to be a consequence of the disease and not the origin."

The idea for the new proposal came from a dramatic increase in antler breakages seen in Spain in 2005. When scientists analysed these antlers in detail, they realised that weakening was due to manganese depletion caused by the deer's diet. That year saw an intensely cold winter which in turn caused plants to reduce their manganese concentrations in response to such stress.

"Antlers grow by transferring 20% of the skeleton's calcium towards their structure. We therefore saw that it was not calcium deficiency that caused the weakening but rather the deficiency of manganese," clarifies Landete. "The lack of manganese was almost as if the 'glue' that sticks calcium to antlers bones was missing."

Links to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease

In the case of humans, the researchers suggest that manganese is extracted from the bones when it is required by the "most important" organs, such as the brain. The researcher adds that "maintaining the bones is important, but even more so is sustaining the working of the brain, which uses 25% of our energy intake when at rest."

The team also points out that when this vital mineral runs out after the onset of osteoporosis, conditions like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and senile dementia could strike. To put this theory to the test, they analysed data from 113 patients who were operated on for osteoporosis and osteoarthritis (wear and tear of joint cartilage) at Hellνn Hospital in Albacete, Spain between 2008 and 2009. Some 40% of those operated on for osteoporosis showed some form of cerebral dysfunction whereas this was not the case in any of the 68 patients operated on for osteoarthritis.

Furthermore, the percentage increased with age and only amongst those patients with osteoporosis. The exhaustion of manganese reserves could be behind the bone disease and the cerebral degeneration. "We are collecting human bones to confirm this. However, studies on rats in which Alzheimer's disease has been induced by aluminium intoxication show that as the severity of this disease increases, manganese levels in the bones decrease," says Landete.

The researcher also recalls studies that link manganese to Parkinson's disease and show that astrocytes, which provide support to neurons, have specific enzymes that require manganese. In any case, researchers outline that their theory "is not a final solution to such diseases but constitutes the first step in a new direction" -- a new direction that requires validation and confirmation from the scientific community.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Plataforma SINC. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Tomas Landete-Castillejos. Alternative hypothesis for the origin of osteoporosis: The role of Mn. Frontiers in Bioscience, 2012; E4 (1): 1385 DOI: 10.2741/468

Cite This Page:

Plataforma SINC. "Deer antlers inspire a new theory on osteoporosis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 January 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120103134915.htm>.
Plataforma SINC. (2012, January 3). Deer antlers inspire a new theory on osteoporosis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120103134915.htm
Plataforma SINC. "Deer antlers inspire a new theory on osteoporosis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120103134915.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) — Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, cut full-year revenue forecasts because generics could cut into sales of its anti-arthritis drug, Celebrex. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) — Nigerian authorities have shut and quarantined a Lagos hospital where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous economy. David Pollard reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Newsy (July 29, 2014) — According to a new study, just five minutes of running or jogging a day could add years to your life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Newsy (July 29, 2014) — The Ebola outbreak in West Africa poses little threat to Americans, according to officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins