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With extra gene, mice are footloose and cancer free

Date:
March 6, 2012
Source:
Cell Press
Summary:
In a perfect world, we could eat to our heart's content without sacrificing our health and good looks, and now it appears that maybe we can. Mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow. Not only that, but according to new research, the animals also live longer, and that isn't just because they aren't getting cancer, either.

Mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow. Not only that, but according to new research, the animals also live longer, and that isn't just because they aren't getting cancer, either.
Credit: © pressmaster / Fotolia

In a perfect world, we could eat to our heart's content without sacrificing our health and good looks, and now it appears that maybe we can. Mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow. Not only that, but according to the report in the March issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism, the animals also live longer, and that isn't just because they aren't getting cancer, either.

One of the animals' youthful secrets is hyperactive brown fat, which burns energy instead of storing it. The findings add to evidence that tumor suppressors aren't designed only to protect us against cancer, the researchers say. They also point to new treatment strategies aimed to boost brown fat and fight aging.

"Tumor suppressors are actually genes that have been used by evolution to protect us from all kinds of abnormalities," said Manuel Serrano of the Spanish National Cancer Research Center.

In this case, the researchers studied a tumor suppressor commonly lost in human cancers. Mice with an extra copy of the gene known as Pten didn't get cancer, but that's not the half of it. Those mice were also leaner, even as they ate more than controls, Serrano said. That suggested that the animals were experiencing some sort of metabolic imbalance -- and a beneficial one at that.

Cancer protection aside, the animals lived longer than usual. They were also less prone to insulin resistance and had less fat in their livers. Those benefits seem to trace back to the fact that those Pten mice were burning more calories thanks to overactive brown fat. Studies in isolated brown fat cells confirmed that a boost in Pten increases the activity of those cells. Pten also made it easier for brown fat to form.

"This tumor suppressor protects against metabolic damage associated with aging by turning on brown fat," Serrano says.

A small compound inhibitor that mimics the effects of Pten also came with those varied benefits. That's encouraging news for the prospect of finding a drug that might do for us what the extra Pten gene did for the mice.

After all, Serrano said, humans were built for a time when 30 would have been considered old age. "We're well protected against cancer and cardiovascular disease" early in life. As it has become commonplace to live to the age of 80, we could all use a little help.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ana Ortega-Molina, Alejo Efeyan, Elena Lopez-Guadamillas, Maribel Muñoz-Martin, Gonzalo Gómez-López, Marta Cañamero, Francisca Mulero, Joaquin Pastor, Sonia Martinez, Eduardo Romanos, M. Mar Gonzalez-Barroso, Eduardo Rial, Angela M. Valverde, James R. Bischoff, Manuel Serrano. Pten Positively Regulates Brown Adipose Function, Energy Expenditure, and Longevity. Cell Metabolism, 2012; 15 (3): 382 DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2012.02.001

Cite This Page:

Cell Press. "With extra gene, mice are footloose and cancer free." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 March 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120306131252.htm>.
Cell Press. (2012, March 6). With extra gene, mice are footloose and cancer free. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120306131252.htm
Cell Press. "With extra gene, mice are footloose and cancer free." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120306131252.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

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