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Anatomic existence of the elusive G-spot confirmed, study claims

Date:
April 25, 2012
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
For centuries, women have been reporting engorgement of the upper, anterior part of the vagina during the stage of sexual excitement, despite the fact the structure of this phenomenon had not been anatomically determined. A new study documents that this elusive structure does exist anatomically.

For centuries, women have been reporting engorgement of the upper, anterior part of the vagina during the stage of sexual excitement, despite the fact the structure of this phenomenon had not been anatomically determined.

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A new study published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine documents that this elusive structure does exist anatomically.

Adam Ostrzenski, M.D., Ph.D., of the Institute of Gynecology in St. Petersburg, FL, conducted a stratum-by-stratum anterior vaginal wall dissection on an 83-year-old cadaver. The dissection established the presence of the G-spot, a well-delineated sac structure located on the dorsal (back) perineal membrane, 16.5 mm from the upper part of the urethral meatus, creating a 35 degree angle with the lateral (side) border of the urethra.

Having 3 distinct regions, the G-spot emerged with dimensions of length (L) of 8.1 mm x width (W) 3.6 mm to 1.5 mm x height (H) 0.4 mm. Upon removal of the entire structure with the adjacent margin tissues, the G-spot stretched from 8.1 to 33 mm.

"This study confirmed the anatomic existence of the G-spot, which may lead to a better understanding and improvement of female sexual function," Ostrzenski concludes.

Irwin Goldstein, editor-in-chief of The Journal of Sexual Medicine believes that research in women's sexual health issues is important. "This case study in a single cadaver adds to the growing body of literature regarding women's sexual anatomy and physiology."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Adam Ostrzenski. G-Spot Anatomy: A New Discovery. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 2012; 9 (5): 1355 DOI: 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2012.02668.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Anatomic existence of the elusive G-spot confirmed, study claims." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 April 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120425094741.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2012, April 25). Anatomic existence of the elusive G-spot confirmed, study claims. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120425094741.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Anatomic existence of the elusive G-spot confirmed, study claims." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120425094741.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

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