Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

3-D movies linked to increased vision symptoms

Date:
July 2, 2012
Source:
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Summary:
Watching 3-D movies can "immerse" you in the experience -— but can also lead to visual symptoms and even motion sickness, reports a new article.

Watching 3D movies can "immerse" you in the experience -- but can also lead to visual symptoms and even motion sickness, reports a study -- "Stereoscopic Viewing and Reported Perceived Immersion and Symptoms," in the July issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.

Related Articles


The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Symptoms related to 3D viewing are affected by where you sit while watching, and even how old you are. "Younger viewers incurred higher immersion but also greater visual and motion sickness symptoms in 3D viewing," according to the authors, led by Shun-nan Yang, PhD, of Pacific University College of Optometry, Forest Grove, Ore. "Both [problems] will be reduced if a farther distance and a wider viewing angle are adopted."

Greater 'Immersion' in 3D Also Associated With Increased Symptoms

The researchers performed experiments in which adults, from young adult to middle-aged, were invited to watch a movie (Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs) in 2D or 3D while sitting at different angles and distances. Visual and other symptoms were assessed -- including the role of factors including age, seating position, and level of "immersion" in the movie.

Twenty-one percent of participants reported symptoms while watching the movie in 3D, compared to twelve percent with 2D viewing. For younger study participants blurred vision, double vision, dizziness, disorientation, and nausea were all more frequent and severe when watching the movie in 3D.

3D viewing also led to a greater sense of immersion -- "a greater sense of object motion and motion of the viewer in space" -- compared to 2D viewing. Subjects sitting in more central or closer positions reported greater immersion as well as increased symptoms of motion sickness -- that is, nausea. Sitting at an angle to the screen was associated with less immersion as well as reduced motion symptoms.

There were some differences by age, including a lower rate of blurred vision in older viewers (age 46 and older). Older viewers had more visual and motion sickness symptoms in 2D viewing, while younger viewers (age 24 to 34) had more symptoms in 3D viewing. The same age-related changes leading to lower rates of blurred vision in older viewers may also explain their lower rates of symptoms during 3D vision.

As 3D movies become more common, including on home screens, there are reports of visual and other symptoms among 3D viewers. Vision and orientation symptoms related to 3D viewing may be related to a "mismatch" between focusing and converging the eyes. Anthony Adams, OD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Optometry and Vision Science notes "the technology for reducing mismatch between where the eyes converge and where they focus is likely to improve rapidly."

The study identifies several factors associated with symptoms during 3D viewing. "3D viewing is quite specific in causing blurred vision and double vision, and the resultant symptoms are greater for younger adults," Dr Yang and colleagues write. 3D produces a greater sense of immersion than 2D viewing, which leads to more symptoms of motion sickness -- especially for younger adults and when viewing from a closer distance and a more direct angle.

The study will help optometrists and other eye care professionals in talking to patients about visual and other symptoms related to today's sophisticated 3D video setups.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Shun-nan Yang, Tawny Schlieski, Brent Selmins, Scott C. Cooper, Rina A. Doherty, Philip J. Corriveau, James E. Sheedy. Stereoscopic Viewing and Reported Perceived Immersion and Symptoms. Optometry and Vision Science, 2012; 89 (7): 1068 DOI: 10.1097/OPX.0b013e31825da430

Cite This Page:

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. "3-D movies linked to increased vision symptoms." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120702132942.htm>.
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. (2012, July 2). 3-D movies linked to increased vision symptoms. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120702132942.htm
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. "3-D movies linked to increased vision symptoms." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120702132942.htm (accessed December 17, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

AP (Dec. 17, 2014) A wave of flu illnesses has forced some Ohio schools to shut down over the past week. State officials confirmed one pediatric flu-related death, a 15-year-old girl in southern Ohio. (Dec. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
In Rural Sierra Leone the Red Cross Battles Ebola

In Rural Sierra Leone the Red Cross Battles Ebola

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) The Red Cross battles the Ebola virus in rural Sierra Leone and its fallout. In one treatment centre in the city of Kenema, the Red Cross also runs a kindergarten. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins