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Discovery improves understanding of early onset inflammatory disease

Date:
July 5, 2012
Source:
University of East Anglia
Summary:
Scientists have discovered a ‘constant cloud’ of potent inflammatory molecules surrounding the cells responsible for diseases such as thickening of the arteries and rheumatoid arthritis.

A scanning electron microscope image of human blood showing red blood cells and several infection-fighting white blood cells including a monocyte.
Credit: US National Cancer Institute/Bruce Wetzel/Harry Schaefer

Scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) have discovered a 'constant cloud' of potent inflammatory molecules surrounding the cells responsible for diseases such as thickening of the arteries and rheumatoid arthritis.

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Published online recently by The Journal of Cell Science, the findings could eventually lead to new treatments for chronic inflammatory diseases. Cardiovascular disease arising from atherosclerosis (thickening of the arteries) kills around 17 million people worldwide each year, including 120,000 people in England and Wales, while rheumatoid arthritis affects around 400,000 people in the UK.

The UEA team studied a type of white blood cell called monocytes. Monocytes play an important role in the human immune system and help protect our bodies against infection. But they can also invade tissue, triggering the early stages of common inflammatory diseases.

The researchers detected for the first time that monocytes were surrounded by a constant cloud. This cloud was found to be made up of potent inflammatory molecules called adenosine triphosphate, or ATP. Further study showed that the ATP molecules were being propelled through the cell wall by the actions of lysosomes. Lysosomes are sub-cellular compartments within blood cells which had previously been thought to only break down cell waste.

"These unexpected findings shed light on the very early stages in the development of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis," said lead author Dr Samuel Fountain of UEA's School of Biological Sciences.

"We found that lysosomes are actually highly dynamic and play a key role in the way inflammatory cells function. This is an exciting development that we hope will lead to the discovery of new targets for inflammatory drugs in around five years and potential new treatments beyond that."

Dr Fountain said further study was now needed to investigate how to control the release of ATP by lysosomes in monocytes and other white blood cells, and to understand how inflammation may be affected in patients with inherited diseases involving lysosomes.

Dr Fountain is a Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) David Phillips Fellow and recently received 0.9m from the BBSRC to study how cells use ATP as a signalling molecule.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of East Anglia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Venketesh Sivaramakrishnan, Stefan Bidula, Hinnah Campwala, Divya Katikaneni, and Samuel J. Fountain. Constitutive lysosome exocytosis releases ATP and engages P2Y receptors in human monocytes. The Journal of Cell Science, July 5, 2012 DOI: 10.1242/jcs.107318

Cite This Page:

University of East Anglia. "Discovery improves understanding of early onset inflammatory disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120705133752.htm>.
University of East Anglia. (2012, July 5). Discovery improves understanding of early onset inflammatory disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120705133752.htm
University of East Anglia. "Discovery improves understanding of early onset inflammatory disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120705133752.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

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