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Strobe eyewear training improves visual memory

Date:
July 23, 2012
Source:
Duke University
Summary:
Participants in a new study engaged in physical activities, such as playing catch, while using either specialized eyewear that limits vision to only brief snapshots or while using eyewear with clear lenses that provides uninterrupted vision. There was an observed boost in their visual memory retention that was found to still be active 24 hours later.

Participants in a Duke University study engaged in physical activities, such as playing catch, while using either specialized eyewear that limits vision to only brief snapshots or while using eyewear with clear lenses that provides uninterrupted vision.
Credit: Image courtesy of Duke University

Stroboscopic training, performing a physical activity while using eyewear that simulates a strobe-like experience, has been found to increase visual short-term memory retention, and the effects lasted 24 hours.

Participants in a Duke University study engaged in physical activities, such as playing catch, while using either specialized eyewear that limits vision to only brief snapshots or while using eyewear with clear lenses that provides uninterrupted vision. Participants completed a computer-based visual memory test before and after the physical activities. Research participants came from the Duke community. Many were recruited from University-organized sports teams, including varsity-level players. The study found that participants who trained with the strobe eyewear gained a boost in visual memory abilities.

Participants completed a memory test that required them to note the identity of eight letters of the alphabet that were briefly displayed on a computer screen. After a variable delay, participants were asked to recall one of the eight letters. On easy-level trials, the recall prompt came immediately after the letters disappeared, but on more difficult trials, the prompt came as late as 2.5 seconds following the display. Because participants did not know which letter they would be asked to recall, they had to retain all of the items in memory.

"Humans have a memory buffer in their brain that keeps information alive for a certain short-lived period," said Greg Appelbaum, assistant professor of psychiatry at Duke University and first author of the study. "Wearing the strobe eyewear during the physical training seemed to boost the ability to retain information in this buffer."

The strobe eyewear disrupts vision by only allowing the user to see glimpses of the world. The user must adjust their visual processing in order to perform normally, and this adjustment produces a lingering benefit; once participants removed the strobe eyewear, there was an observed boost in their visual memory retention, which was found to last 24 hours.

Earlier work by Appelbaum and the project's senior researcher, Stephen Mitroff, had shown that stroboscopic training improves visual perception, including the ability to detect subtle motion cues and the processing of briefly presented visual information. Yet the earlier study had not determined how long the benefits might last.

"Our earlier work on stroboscopic training showed that it can improve perceptual abilities, but we don't know exactly how," says Mitroff, associate professor of psychology & neuroscience and member of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. "This project takes a big step by showing that these improved perceptual abilities are driven, at least in part, by improvements in visual memory."

"Improving human cognition is an important goal with so many benefits," said Appelbaum, also a member of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. "Interestingly, our findings demonstrate one way in which visual experience has the capacity to improve cognition."

Participants for the study came from the 2010-2011 Duke University men's and women's varsity soccer teams, Duke's 2010-2011 men's basketball team and members of the general Duke community. Mitroff reported that participants had little or no trouble with the stroboscopic training, and several participants later returned to inquire about how they could be involved as research assistants.

The research was supported by Nike SPARQ Sensory Performance, who designed the eyewear and is marketing it as Nike SPARQ Vapor Strobe. The study appears online July 19 in Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Duke University. The original article was written by Julie Rhodes. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. L. Gregory Appelbaum, Matthew S. Cain, Julia E. Schroeder, Elise F. Darling, Stephen R. Mitroff. Stroboscopic visual training improves information encoding in short-term memory. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 2012; DOI: 10.3758/s13414-012-0344-6

Cite This Page:

Duke University. "Strobe eyewear training improves visual memory." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120723171850.htm>.
Duke University. (2012, July 23). Strobe eyewear training improves visual memory. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120723171850.htm
Duke University. "Strobe eyewear training improves visual memory." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120723171850.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

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