Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cost-effective production of infrared lenses

Date:
August 8, 2012
Source:
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft
Summary:
If visibility is poor, thermal cameras can warn drivers of people or animals on the road. Yet such devices have been very expensive – until now. An important step has been taken to manufacture them more cheaply. A new process will make the infrared lenses – a component of such cameras – up to 70 percent cheaper.

Thermal image, taken with pressed lenses in a test camera. Below: Pressed lenses made ofchalcogenide glass.
Credit: © Fraunhofer IWM

If visibility is poor, thermal cameras can warn drivers of people or animals on the road. Yet such devices have been very expensive -- until now. An important step has been taken to manufacture them more cheaply. A new process will make the infrared lenses -- a component of such cameras -- up to 70 percent cheaper.

Rain pelts down on the roof of the car; it is difficult to make out anything in the pitch dark. Suddenly, a deer runs out of the forest and onto the road, but the driver cannot respond in time. When it comes to such dangerous situations, micro-bolometers constitute one way of "extending" the human eye and defusing such dangerous situations. They detect infrared rays -- in other words, the heat emitted by a living creature -- and in case of danger, warn the driver through an acoustic signal or a warning light. At about 2,000 euros, these devices are still quite expensive and are only being used in luxury-class vehicles.

Production costs drop by over 70 percent

Part for part, these devices should be getting more affordable. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM in Freiburg are working on the infrared lenses that are in the cameras. "We have developed a production process for lenses that enables us to lower the costs of these components by more than 70 percent. Thus the prize for the micro-bolometer could be reduced," says Dr. Helen Mόller, scientist at IWM. Normally, the lenses are made out of crystalline materials like germanium, zinc selenide or zinc sulfide. The problem is that these materials are very expensive and can only be processed mechanically -- it takes grinding, polishing or diamond turning to shape them into the correctly. Obviously this involves high processing costs. "Instead of crystalline materials, we use the amorphous chalcogenide glass. Its softening temperature -- that is, the temperature at which it can be formed -- is low. Therefore, we can form it using non-isothermic hot stamping," says Mόller.

This process is similar to making waffles on a waffle iron. The researchers place the chalcogenide glass between two pressing tools which determine the form of the required lenses. Then, it is heated and formed between both pressing tools -- the "waffle iron" is clamped together. After a few minutes, the glass is cooled again to below the softening temperature and removed. And thus, the lens is already perfect. In contrast to conventionally processed optics, it no longer has to be further refined. The lenses manufactured this way exhibit the same excellent optical imaging quality as those that are polished. To ensure that no glass remains attached to the tools, their surface is coated with anti-adhesive, non-stick coatings, similar to the Teflon coating on a waffle iron. The scientists now want to further refine the process towards cost-effective mass production.

The applications for micro-bolometers -- and thus for cost-effective lenses -- are not limited to the automotive sector. Imagine, for example, these devices assisting older people in their homes, If the senior were to fall, the bolometer registers this event and sends an alarm to relatives or neighbors through an optical or acoustic signal. In production halls, bolometers can oversee and monitor the production processes of various products, to ensure the necessary temperatures are maintained and warn employees who are spending time in danger zones. In residential buildings, the devices could detect energy leaks, such as through unsealed windows or poorly insulated walls.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. "Cost-effective production of infrared lenses." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120808093811.htm>.
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. (2012, August 8). Cost-effective production of infrared lenses. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120808093811.htm
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. "Cost-effective production of infrared lenses." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120808093811.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming

The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming

AP (July 28, 2014) — AP Investigation: As the Obama administration weans the country off dirty fuels, energy companies are ramping-up overseas coal exports at a heavy price. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shipping Crates Get New 'lease' On Life

Shipping Crates Get New 'lease' On Life

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 25, 2014) — Shipping containers have been piling up as America imports more than it exports. Some university students in Washington D.C. are set to get a first-hand lesson in recycling. Their housing is being built using refashioned shipping containers. Lily Jamali reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

AFP (July 25, 2014) — Europe's highest train, the little train of Artouste in the French Pyrenees, celebrates its 80th birthday. Duration: 01:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
TSA Administrator on Politics and Flight Bans

TSA Administrator on Politics and Flight Bans

AP (July 24, 2014) — TSA administrator, John Pistole's took part in the Aspen Security Forum 2014, where he answered questions on lifting of the ban on flights into Israel's Tel Aviv airport and whether politics played a role in lifting the ban. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins