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Spacetime: A smoother brew than we knew

Date:
August 23, 2012
Source:
Michigan Technological University
Summary:
Spacetime may be less like beer and more like sipping whiskey. Or so an intergalactic photo finish would suggest. Physicists reached this heady conclusion after studying the tracings of three photons of differing wavelengths that were recorded by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in May 2009. Photons from a gamma-ray burst jetted 7 billion light years across the universe and arrived at Earth in a dead heat, calling into question just how foamy the universe may be.

Gamma-ray burst.
Credit: Image courtesy of Michigan Technological University

Spacetime may be less like beer and more like sipping whiskey. Or so an intergalactic photo finish would suggest.

Physicist Robert Nemiroff of Michigan Technological University reached this heady conclusion after studying the tracings of three photons of differing wavelengths that were recorded by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in May 2009.

The photons originated about 7 billion light years away from Earth in one of three pulses from a gamma-ray burst. They arrived at the orbiting telescope just one millisecond apart, in a virtual tie.

Gamma-ray bursts are short-lived bursts of gamma-ray photons, the most energetic form of light. They can originate far across the universe, and astronomers believe many are caused by giant stars collapsing, often billions of years before Earth was formed.

"Gamma-ray bursts can tell us some very interesting things about the universe," Nemiroff said. In this case, those three photons recorded by the Fermi telescope suggest that spacetime may not be not as bubbly as some scientists think.

Some theories of quantum gravity say that the universe is not smooth but foamy -- made of fundamental units called Planck lengths that are less than a trillionth of a trillionth the diameter of a hydrogen atom. Planck lengths are so small that there's no way to detect them, except via photons like those that make up gamma-ray bursts.

Here's why. The wavelengths of these photons are some of the shortest distances known to science -- so short they should interact with the even smaller Planck length. And if they interact, the photons should be dispersed -- scattered -- on their trek through Planck length-pixelated spacetime.

In particular, they should disperse in different ways if their wavelengths differ, just as a ping pong ball and a softball might take alternate paths down a gravely hillside.

You wouldn't notice the scattering over short distances, but across billions of light years, the Planck lengths should disperse the light. And three photons from the same gamma-ray burst should not have crashed through the Fermi telescope at the same moment.

But they did, and that calls into question just how foamy spacetime really is. "We have shown that the universe is smooth across the Planck mass," Nemiroff said. "That means that there's no choppiness that's detectable. It's a really cool discovery. We're very excited."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Michigan Technological University. The original article was written by Marcia Goodrich. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Robert Nemiroff, Ryan Connolly, Justin Holmes, Alexander Kostinski. Bounds on Spectral Dispersion from Fermi-Detected Gamma Ray Bursts. Physical Review Letters, 2012; 108 (23) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.231103

Cite This Page:

Michigan Technological University. "Spacetime: A smoother brew than we knew." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120823111507.htm>.
Michigan Technological University. (2012, August 23). Spacetime: A smoother brew than we knew. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120823111507.htm
Michigan Technological University. "Spacetime: A smoother brew than we knew." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120823111507.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

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